Yi mpaeɛ  

 
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):0

I want to pour libations to our Nananom Nsamanfo. I've been involved in many libations in the area, so I'm familiar with the process and how its done here [Mpoano Tenten/Long Beach, Ca]. However, I was interested if the Akan followed a certain ritual process when pouring libations. If anyone has any information on the subject or knows of any resource that might be of any assistance please share. Meda ase pa ara

Quote
Posted : 12/23/2009 6:20 am
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):0

Akhu ne Obadele, meda mo ase

Akhu directed me to a post that Okyeame Kwame made on another forum that addressed my question about Akan libation, I hope you'll find this as enrichining and useful as I do!

"This is a sample libation in part as adapted from "Spirit of the dead Rise Up" as spoken by Nana Oscar Brown Jr.

i say in part because for any Akan libation to be complete there has to be 4 parts.

Ɔfrɛ- the call
Botaeɛ- the reason for the call
Nhyirasrɛ- asking for blessings
Nnome- asking for curses on all enemies

Akan Wartime Libation and Translation
Fochidi - Ewe Concept of 'Libation'

"The word 'chi' means the primal force, that which expresses itself as consciousness. The 'chi' manifests itself as mind. All embodied 'chi' can enter into a zone where the whole of creation flows into one life. So 'chi' is a creative force. And there are formulas by which we set the 'chi' into a state of vibration, and by so doing whatever we ask becomes. You use sound and water (alcohol in libation pouring symbolises water) because 'chi' is related to both. Both sound and water are the source of life. So libation pouring is simply setting your life-force into a state of vibration. Therefore, 'fochidi' means set your life force into vibration and let it sound so that other life forces may hear and heed your sound. You direct at the causes of all causes, and it will bring you what you want. Vibration is the mother of creation."

Dr. Dartey Kumodji
from "Sunsum as Conscious Energy: A Viable Scientific Postulate" by Martin Adjei

Water was used and white palm wine were used.

Mpaebɔ ne Mpaeyi = to call out to pae=to split/open

nsaguo - the pouring of spirits ne nsuguo- the pouring of water

================================================== =========

This is a translation/adaptation of Oscar Brown Jr.'s Spirit of the Dead from Haile Gerima's Sankofa and made into a libation...it was so powerful i was like y it cain't be powerful in the languages of Our Ancestors? ...stay BlackNificent!
================================================== ========

Mfitiaseε/Ɔfrε

__________________________________________________ _
Onyankopɔn Twereduampɔn Kwame,
[yaw]
Ɔdomankoma a wobɔɔ kuru bɔɔ krane krankye
[yaw]
Wokɔɔ ko anaa kɔɔ bata,
[yaw]
Na ‘sono abubu dan,
[yaw]
Asase a wodi amu a wosan ma yɛn aduane die, due due due dammirifua due, due ne amanehunu!
[yaw]
Bosonopo, wo a wogyee afunu
[yaw]
Nseɛdo asiei mu prammiri
[yaw]
Abosom nnuasa nyinaa ara, due o!
[yaw]
Mmusuo
[yaw]
Asiane
[yaw]
ɛhaw
[yaw]
Kɔkɔ damu
[yaw]
Mogyabum ne mogyaguo
[yaw]
Me Nananom, mo nyinaa firi atifi anafo apuei ne atɔe ee! Dammirifua due ne abodwokyɛre!
[yaw]
Nananom Nsamanfoɔ ee! monsɔre ɛ!
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman a ɛreka hɔ, monsɔre nkɔsi mo akwantu-‘nomaa no soɔ
[yaw]
Abibifoɔ a wɔayi mo adwo, montu firi ɛpom’ mfiri ahyɛn aseɛ, monni mo asɛm ho adanseɛ
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman a ɛreka hɔ, monsɔre nkɔsi mo kokosofoɔ soɔ
[yaw]
Mo a wɔbɔɔ mo duam faa mo nnommum,
[yaw]
Montu mfiri ahwereɛ mfuo kɛseɛ ne asaawa mfuo kɛseɛ a ɛkɔɔ Twi kɔɔ Brɛman nni mo ho asɛm ho adanse
[yaw]
Nananom Nsamanfoɔ, monsɔre o!
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman a ɛreka hɔ, monsɔre nkɔsi mo akwantuo ‘nomaa soɔ
[yaw]
Deɛ ɔɔmo sɛn mo mene odum kɛseɛ soɔ
[yaw]
Mo a mohinhim kisibirie dubaa soɔ
[yaw]
A moakɔdane Onyankopasakyie namprɔwe
[yaw]
Monsiane nkɔpɛ mo nsɛm nkɔka a ma emu da hɔ
[yaw]
Nananom Nsamanfoɔ e! Monsɔre ɛ!
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman a ɛretwɛn hɔ, monsɔre nkɔsi mo kokosofoɔ soɔ
[yaw]
Nkyehama-mu-foɔ, mo a wɔkyekyeree mo twaa mo mmaa firi Brasil kɔ
Mississippi
[yaw]
Montia adadeɛ so nkɔbɔ mo kaaseɛ
[yaw]
Deɛ ɛwɔ Jamaica mu,
[yaw]
Wɔ Cuba mu mfuo
[yaw]
Wɔ Florida mu baka
[yaw]
Mo Abibifoɔ a moretwɛn hɔ, montiam nkɔbɔ mo anom kaaseɛ
[yaw]
Nananom Nsamanfoɔ ee! monsɔre ɛ!
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman a ɛreka hɔ, monsɔre nsi mo sankɔfa‘nomaa soɔ
[yaw]
ɛfiri Alabama kɔ Suriname,
[yaw]
kɔpem Louisiana mu abodan,
[yaw]
Firi hɔ o! Mo Abibifoɔ Nsamanfoɔ,
[yaw]
Tu firi hɔ! Monkɔpɛ mo kaaseɛ nkɔbɔ o!
[yaw]
Mmaa a wɔtoo mo mmonaa
[yaw]
Nhyɛsoɔ dwamannorɔ frafoɔ,
[yaw]
Asae,
[yaw]
A wɔhyehye mo ho dwerebee,
[yaw]
Sraa mo ho amane de ntakra fam hɔ,
[yaw]
Honamto, Nipaduatwa, Adwenetuo,
[yaw]
Akyerehama-kyere ne anosiw,
[yaw]
Mo Abibifoɔ Nsamanfoɔ a!
[yaw]
Nananom Nsamanfoɔ monsɔre ɛ!
[yaw]
Deɛ wawu asaman monsɔre nkɔsi mo sankɔfa-anomaa soɔ
[yaw]
Mo nyinaa mmra mmεgye nsuo
[yaw]

Botaeε/Aseε
__________________________________________________ ______________

Na εne deεn? Ɛne sε, εnnε da yi na yεbεko!
[yaw]
Saa Memeneda yi ara na yεbεgye awere wɔ atamfoɔ nsa mu
[yaw]
Nsakrae ntira
[yaw]
Treneesεm ntira
[yaw]
Adεnnεnye ntira
[yaw]
Nkwa ntira

Nhyirasrε
__________________________________________________ _____________

Yεsrε mo nkwa ne akwahosan
[yaw]
Nyansa
[yaw]
Akokoduru
[yaw]
Ahoɔden
[yaw]
Anihutumi
[yaw]
Asotetumi
[yaw]
Ɔmandɔree
[yaw]

Duabɔ
__________________________________________________ __________

Na ɔtamfoɔ biara a ɔmpε yεn nkɔsoɔ biara no deε, ɔnwu awia ketekete
[yaw]
ɔbɔ bra biara a, mommma no nnyε yie
[yaw]
Ɔnhwe aseε pɔtɔɔ na yεnkɔfo n’agyapadeε nyinaa
[yaw]
N’asefoɔ nyinaa aseε nhye na εrenka baako koraa!
[yaw]
Ogya nhye, ogya nhye, ogya nhye wɔn dwerebee!
[yaw]

Awieε
__________________________________________________ ______________
Mommεhyira yεn a yεahyia ha yi nyinaa
[yaw]
Mommεgye nsa yi nnom no prεko
[yaw]
Momma mmusuo biara nka yεn
[yaw]
Yεn a yεahyia ha yi nyinaa nkwa so.
[Mo ne kasa]

Beginning/Invocation
__________________________________________________ _____________
Great Shining One, Great-Tree-That-One-Leans-Upon-That-Does-Not-Fall, Saturday Born
[yaw]
The Benefactor to the Masses who created all
[yaw]
Have you gone to war or on an expedition,
[yaw]
Because an elephant has destroyed the house,
[yaw]
The earth who swallows the corpse who turns around and gives us food to eat,
[yaw]
Consolations, consolations, consolations, for the catastrophe!
[yaw]
Great Ocean who receives the corpses
[yaw]
Abyss-dwelling spitting cobra
[yaw]
All thirty Abosom, consolations o!
[yaw]
Evil!
[yaw]
Misfortune!
[yaw]
Pain
Bloodletting and Slaughter!
[yaw]
My ancestors, all of you from the north south east and west! Consolations for long-suffering and restlessness for not being avenged!
[yaw]
Ancestral Spirits Arise!
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your bird of passage.
[yaw]
Those stolen Africans step out of the ocean from the wombs of the ships and claim your story.
[yaw]
Spirit of the Dead rise up,
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your vessel.
[yaw]
Those Africans shackled in leg irons and enslaved,
[yaw]
Step out of the acres of cane fields and cotton fields and tell your story.
[yaw]
Spirit of the Dead rise up,
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your bird of passage.
[yaw]
Those lynched in the magnolias,
[yaw]
swinging on the limbs of the weeping willows,
[yaw]
who became vultures rotten meat,
[yaw]
Step down and claim your story.
[yaw]
Spirit of the Dead rise up,
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your vessel.
[yaw]
Those tied, bound, and whipped from Brazil to Mississippi
[yaw]
Step out and tell your story.
[yaw]
Those in Jamaica,
[yaw]
in the fields of Cuba,
[yaw]
in the swamps of Florida,
[yaw]
the rice fields of South Carolina
[yaw]
You waiting Africans step out and tell your story.
[yaw]
Spirit of the Dead rise up,
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your bird of passage.
[yaw]
From Alabama to Suriname,
[yaw]
Up to the caves of Louisiana.
[yaw]
Come out! You African Spirits,
[yaw]
Step out! And claim your stories.
[yaw]
You raped,
[yaw]
Slave bred,
[yaw]
Castrated,
[yaw]
Burned,
[yaw]
Tarred and feathered,
[yaw]
Roasted, chopped, lobotomized,
[yaw]
Bound and gagged.
[yaw]
You African Spirits!
[yaw]
Spirit of the Dead rise up,
[yaw]
Lingering Spirit of the Dead rise up and possess your bird of passage.
[yaw]

Aim/Reason for Invoking
__________________________________________________ ________________

What is it? It is that today on this day WE will fight!
[yaw]
On this very Saturday WE will avenge Ourselves on Our enemies
[yaw]
For Change
[yaw]
For Justice
[yaw]
For Balance
[yaw]
For Life!
[yaw]

Asking for Blessings
__________________________________________________ _____________

WE beg y’all for life and good health
[yaw]
Wisdom
[yaw]
Courage
[yaw]
Strength
[yaw]
Vision
[yaw]
Hearing
[yaw]
The expansion of the nation
[yaw]

The Curse (my favorite section)
__________________________________________________ __________
And any enemy who doesn’t want US to progress, let him or her die in the scorching sun
[yaw]
if he or she attempts to live any life, don’t let them do well
[yaw]
Let them fall down utterly that WE may expropriate all their possessions
[yaw]
Let all of their descendants burn without leaving a single one at all!
[yaw]
Fire burn, fire burn, fire burn them utterly!
[yaw]

The End
__________________________________________________ _______________
Y’all bless all of US who are gathered here
[yaw]
Y’all receive this drink and drink all at once
[yaw]
Y’all don’t let any evil fall upon US
[yaw]
All of US who are gathered here, life!
[Congratulations for speaking]"

Obadele-Mo! Mo ne adwuma! WoayE adeE pa ara!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/28/2009 4:13 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Afrikan! Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):9518

M'ani agye sE woahu mpaeE a metwerEE no. YEregu so!

Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko. "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members" – Kikôngo proverb “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.” – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters." – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr
Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD Email: [email protected] Skype: obadele.kambon Paypal: www.paypal.me/akali Abibifahodie Family of Websites:
www.obadelekambon.com | www.abibitumikasa.com | www.abibifahodie.com | www.abibifahodie.org www.sankofajourney.com | www.letsbuyblack.com | www.asaseheals.com www.kamaukambon.org | www.amakambon.com | www.bennucenter.com www.nubusinesssolutions.com | www.onipa.com | www.lastblackman.com
 

Ọbádélé Kambon's Personal app for Android
Abibitumi Kasa Social Education Network App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for iOS

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/29/2009 3:17 am
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):0

Prayer
Prayer is a common feature of Akan worship, offered in libation, during which seven virtues of grace are usually requested. These are:

(1) Life and good health- Nkwa
(2) Grace- Adom
(3) Peace- Asomdwoe
(4) Fertility of sex, potency, and procreativity- Abawotumi
(5) Power of good eyesight- Anihutumi
(6) Power of good hearing- Asotetumi
(7) Prosperity of land and state- AmandOree

excerpt from The Akans of Ghana: Their History & Culture by K. Nkansa Kyeremateng available @ Abibitumi Kasa bookstore for $10
The Akans of Ghana: Their History and Culture [PDF] 109 pgs [Akans of Ghana] - $10.00 : :: Abibitumi Kasa Bookstore, A BlackNificent Online Bookstore! ::

This post was modified 2 months ago by Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD
ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/03/2010 5:12 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Afrikan! Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):9518

Nwoma yi boaa me pa ara. Meda ase sE worema AbibifoO aso ate sE EyE papa pa ara!

Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko. "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members" – Kikôngo proverb “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.” – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters." – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr
Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD Email: [email protected] Skype: obadele.kambon Paypal: www.paypal.me/akali Abibifahodie Family of Websites:
www.obadelekambon.com | www.abibitumikasa.com | www.abibifahodie.com | www.abibifahodie.org www.sankofajourney.com | www.letsbuyblack.com | www.asaseheals.com www.kamaukambon.org | www.amakambon.com | www.bennucenter.com www.nubusinesssolutions.com | www.onipa.com | www.lastblackman.com
 

Ọbádélé Kambon's Personal app for Android
Abibitumi Kasa Social Education Network App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for iOS

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/03/2010 7:00 am
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):0

Libation in the Akan World

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com


Of the major types of rituals in Akan society, libation is the most important. Libation is the
pouring of wine or any alcoholic drink on the ground and reciting a prayer to God, Mother Earth,
the deities and the ancestors.2 Similar practices have been widely recorded in other cultures. For
example, Margaret Alexion discusses similar practices among the ancient Greeks and the
Romans (Alexion 1974: 7). Ceremonial occasions and other religious activities invariably
include libation. Ceremonies such as rites of passage, at birth, puberty, marriage and death, are
all rooted in religious activities during which libation is performed. Preparation of a deity,
making drums, preparation of land for farming, telling oral histories, preparation of folk
medicine, visits to chiefs or deities, and individual undertakings also involve essential religious
libations. Libation is poured even during political meetings and during the opening of public
places.Libation pouring seems to be a general phenomenon in other Ghanaian cultures and in most African societies. Opoku (1978: 9) indicates the spiritual and the religious need for pouring
libation to the African ancestors:

The community in Africa is not only made up of the living, but also of the dead and the reality of this notion is given concrete expression in libation and other sacrifices to the dead whose participation, involvement and blessing are sought, as continuing
members of the community.

Libation is designed to engage the supernatural beings in the lives of human beings. At the same time it demonstrates human belief in the power and the presence of God, the deities and the ancestral spirits. Malefijt (1978: 197) tells vis that the specific messages conveyed to the ancestors, the deities and other supernatural beings are the knowledge, feelings, needs, emotions, mood and desires of the living.

Twi Lexemes and the Performance of Libation

In a ritual, libation has two aspects, the verbal and the non-verbal. Linguistically, the Twi
lexemes for libation carry the semantic meaning of the ritual, fn the process of libation, two sets
of lexemes are used. The first set of lexemes are nsaguo (noun) or gu nsa (verb). Etymologically
gu means "to make fall" and nsa means " an alcoholic drink." Literally then gu nsa means "to
make an alcoholic drink fall" (on the ground).

The second set of lexemes used in the process of libation include: apaesyie (noun), yi apaee
(verb), yi meaning "to take", and apaee meaning "a prayer", or literally, "to take a prayer."
Equally the verb kankye means "to speak a prayer," "to call upon" or "to invoke." This .word is
used for the verbal part of the libation. Hence one can say de nsa yi apaee meaning "using an
alcoholic drink to pray" or de nsa kankye, meaning " using an alcoholic drink to speak a prayer,
or "using and alcoholic drink to call upon or to invoke (the supernatural)."

In a literal sense, pouring an alcoholic drink on the ground is non-verbal. However, using an
alcoholic drink to pray involves both verbal and non-verbal acts. The combination of pouring a
drink on the ground and reciting prayers is a unique, religious form of communication with the
supernatural beings. The prayer part of a libation communicates human needs to the supernatural, while the hospitable offering of an alcoholic beverage symbolically quenches their thirst and pays them the highest respect.

In Akan society the individual is expected to spill a little wine on the ground on any occasion
when wine drinking takes place. Some people also like to spill water during drinking. The prayer
part of the ritual can be avoided, but it is always essential to discharge a little wine or water on
the ground for the supernatural beings before drinking. Although individuals may usually engage
in only the silent part of the libation, their intentions are the same as when the ritual is
accompanied by words. However, the prayer part of libation calls upon an individual's rhetorical
skill and creativity in the use of the Twi language. Prayers in any libation consist of metaphors,
proverbs and many other figurative expressions.

Libation needs no specialists. However, since the libation ritual is basically religious,
individuals who are articulate in the Twi language and culture perform elaborate libation because
they possess the necessary understanding of the Akan belief system. Hence, during ceremonial
occasions the chiefs, the linguists, priests, priestesses and the elders, the key Akan traditional
bearers would be more erudite in the performance of libation than would others (who are less
conversant with Akan tradition) in an informal situation.

One person always performs prayer in libation, but an antiphonal response may be recited
by a second person. For example, every sentence.is punctuated with wie! and ampa! meaning "it
is true!" and "let it be!", the Twi equivalent of "amen". Traditionally, a person who pours a
libation on a ceremonial occasion removes his sandals from his feet and unwraps his cloth to his
chest. This behaviour is a symbol of respect to the supematiial including the ancestors. In
addilion, the Twi phrase tnmo ne kasa, literally "well done for talking," is always a response fromthe audience to end a prayer. - excerpt from Libation In HighLife Songs by Owusu Brempong

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/08/2010 11:04 pm
(@KwameD)
BlackErrific Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):0

The Akan Wartime Libation & Translation (below) is super-serious! Man! Me da ase to Okyeame Kwame for making it available in the first place, and to brothers Akhu and Sundiata Olugbala for bringing it onto this forum.

I am attaching a book entitled "Libation in the Old Testament and Akan Life and Thought: A Critique" that was written by K. K. Amos Anti in 1987. It used to be on the web but the website is no longer actively available. Chapter 4 of this book is particularly useful, since it gives 14 samples of libation prayers, many of which Amos recorded from source. Unfortunately he only gives the English translations of the Akan but these can be adapted and translated back to Akan or back to other Afrikan languages for use. Prayer 11 should be used with care :)

The 14 prayers are:


PRAYER 1 PRAYER OF INVOCATION TO COMMENCE WORK•
PRAYER 2 PRAYER OF INVOCATION TO COMMENCE THE OGUAA HALL WEEK CELEBRATIONS•
PRAYER 3 PRAYER OF INVOCATION TO COMMENCE COCOA EVACUATION •
PRAYER 4 PRAYER OF PETITION FOR A CHILD •
PRAYER 5 PRAYER AT A NAMING CEREMONY •
PRAYER 6 PRAYER AT A FIRST MENSTRUATION CEREMONY •
PRAYER 7 PRAYER IN CONNECTION WITH A MARRIAGE CEREMONY •
PRAYER 8 PRAYER AT GRAVE-DIGGING •
PRAYER 9 THANKSGIVING PRAYER FOR RECOVERY FROM SICKNESS •
PRAYER 10 THANKSGIVING PRAYER FOR SAFE DELIVERY AT NTOA BEA SHRINE - ABURI •
PRAYER 11 PRAYER INVOKING DAMNATION ON ILL-WISHERS •
PRAYER 12 PRAYER OF BLESSING FOR THE STATE•
PRAYER 13 PRAYER FOR PEACE AND HARMONY•
PRAYER 14 PRAYER IN CONNECTION WITH AN ADAE FESTIVAL •

The book contents are shown below:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER ONE: The Akan and their Worldview
CHAPTER TWO: Libation in the Old Testament
CHAPTER THREE: Akan concept of Libation
CHAPTER FOUR: Analysis of some Libation Prayers
CHAPTER FIVE: The Libation Debate: Toward a Conclusion
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Attached files

Libation-in-Akan-life-and-thought.pdf (259.4 KB) 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 03/26/2010 10:00 pm
(@mansa_kankan_musa)
BlackJestic Afrikan Registered
Abibitumi Newbie
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):84

@KwameD

This text is highly misleading. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/23/2019 6:13 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Afrikan! Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):9518
Posted by: @mansa_kankan_musa

@KwameD

This text is highly misleading. 

To say the least. 

Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko. "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members" – Kikôngo proverb “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.” – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters." – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr
Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD Email: [email protected] Skype: obadele.kambon Paypal: www.paypal.me/akali Abibifahodie Family of Websites:
www.obadelekambon.com | www.abibitumikasa.com | www.abibifahodie.com | www.abibifahodie.org www.sankofajourney.com | www.letsbuyblack.com | www.asaseheals.com www.kamaukambon.org | www.amakambon.com | www.bennucenter.com www.nubusinesssolutions.com | www.onipa.com | www.lastblackman.com
 

Ọbádélé Kambon's Personal app for Android
Abibitumi Kasa Social Education Network App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for iOS

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/30/2019 7:40 pm
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Afrikan Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):3619

For example, every sentence.is punctuated with wie! and ampa! meaning "it
is true!" and "let it be!", the Twi equivalent of "amen   Equal sign killing us

“Intellectuals ought to study the past not for the pleasure they find in so doing, but to derive lessons from it”

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/01/2019 5:14 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Afrikan! Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):9518
Posted by: @kevlew

For example, every sentence.is punctuated with wie! and ampa! meaning "it
is true!" and "let it be!", the Twi equivalent of "amen   Equal sign killing us

I get the sense that you're not down with the indiscriminate use of the equal sign between eurasian and Afrikan=Black conceptions of reality. 

Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko. "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members" – Kikôngo proverb “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.” – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters." – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr
Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD Email: [email protected] Skype: obadele.kambon Paypal: www.paypal.me/akali Abibifahodie Family of Websites:
www.obadelekambon.com | www.abibitumikasa.com | www.abibifahodie.com | www.abibifahodie.org www.sankofajourney.com | www.letsbuyblack.com | www.asaseheals.com www.kamaukambon.org | www.amakambon.com | www.bennucenter.com www.nubusinesssolutions.com | www.onipa.com | www.lastblackman.com
 

Ọbádélé Kambon's Personal app for Android
Abibitumi Kasa Social Education Network App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for Android
Abibitumi Chat App for iOS

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/04/2019 6:17 pm
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Afrikan Admin
Abibifahodie Wura!
Abibisika (BlackGold Points):3619

Nah...

“Intellectuals ought to study the past not for the pleasure they find in so doing, but to derive lessons from it”

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/04/2019 9:11 pm

Leave a reply


 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share: