Forum

Names -Afrikan Agen...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Names -Afrikan Agency

Page 2 / 3
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

NKO;242257 wrote: I legally changed my name fourteen years ago. And it was one of the best and most important things I have ever done. In my work I have to introduce myself to patients all day long. Although among my friends I had been using my Akan name for years I still had to call myself by the slave name at work and answer to it. Going through the trouble of legally changing my name means I never have to apply a slave label to myself or answer to it any more. -- very liberating.

All my documents have my Akan name, my slave name has become a distant memory as has my abandoned slave consciousness.

[emoji1477]

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/11/2017 5:59 am
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

Blessings Everyone,
The name changing comes when we reach a certain consciousness: we sometimes feel a deep sense to change the vibrations of our name. You can still be powerful with your slave name , however , changing it shows a real sense of evolving/ change . Change is constantly changing. Some people literally see the need to CHANGE. names do hold vibration and frequency , and most of the time when people change their name , the Name have a Positive Meaning and so on....It is really up to the person. Personally, I think change is Good ; no matter what that change is, location, car, house , lifestyles etc...[emoji846]
Malcom X changed to a Better person after he CHANGED his name.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/11/2017 6:15 am
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

African names are just as good as the slave names. Why not make a change?. Good food for thought [emoji189]

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/11/2017 6:18 am
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

Omawali;256034 wrote: Good point Hi Free-quency. It is not the name that defines the individual. It is the individual that defines the individual. I understand their argument, but at the same time I know myself. Now granted I have instructed my son to change his name when he gets of age, before he gets married and accumulate many things as daddy has. My wife would not approve of me changing my son name or really mine at this point. That's just not a bridge worth creating for myself. Physically we are all slaves. No matter what your name is. Spiritually many of us are free, and it's not because of our name. It's because of our conscious. My slave name lets me know just who and what I am in this physical body, and who my oppressors are. They could never never never be trusted. The most important thing to me that I gave them back was that bullshit god, Jesus, religion, celebration, and all traditions.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

Omawali is it not just the opposite? In Afrikan culture names do define the person and give direction for that person to know their destiny whereas eurasian names do not. Is this your understanding?

Also didn't the "slave names" come out of eurasian traditions? Is that included in "all traditions"? as you mentioned?

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/11/2017 8:29 am
(@hi_free_quency)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

I see many have mentioned Bro. Malcolm in reference to the topic, but my question is did Bro. Malcolm go to the government to have the "official" name change from Little to X? Or was he part of a nation within a nation where he can claim his own identity and sovereignty to a point that no matter where he is outside of the NOI he will be addressed by his affirmed name? You all can recall the video with a TV show host trying to address him by his slave name and he didn't go for that. And mind you that he also changed his name from Bro. Malcolm X to El Hajj Malik El Shabazz. None of those names being Afrikan, yet he had an Afrikan consciousness.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/11/2017 12:29 pm
(@nko)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

At the end of the day, what name is on ones passport? Drivers license? And what name is associated with ones SSN? As far as any legal or financial entity, foreign or domestic that is who you are and is how you will be addressed and the name you must respond to to. Everything else is aliases, nicknames, pen-name, or screen-name. is that good enough? Underneath are we are still "Toby"?

Yesterday I got pulled over at a traffic checkpoint here in Arusha Tanzania where I live, and the cop when examining my drivers license looked at me and asked me where I was from. I said USA, Atlanta. She responded "What tribe" I said "Akan, from Ghana" just to try to get on down the road and avoid a long discussion. She said have a nice day and motioned me on my way. I smiled internally and eased on down the road.

Would she have responded to me differently if my license read "John smith" or some other Eurasian name, not Nana Kwaku Opare? Not being a native Tanzanian the fact I carry an Afrikan name on my documents makes a clear statement that I define myself as Afrikan and that makes difference in how I am perceived and treated. I'm not simply mzungu. And that feels great.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/11/2017 9:54 pm
(@hi_free_quency)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

NKO;256282 wrote: At the end of the day, what name is on ones passport? Drivers license? And what name is associated with ones SSN? As far as any legal or financial entity, foreign or domestic that is who you are and is how you will be addressed and the name you must respond to to. Everything else is aliases, nicknames, pen-name, or screen-name. is that good enough? Underneath are we are still "Toby"?

Yesterday I got pulled over at a traffic checkpoint here in Arusha Tanzania where I live, and the cop when examining my drivers license looked at me and asked me where I was from. I said USA, Atlanta. She responded "What tribe" I said "Akan, from Ghana" just to try to get on down the road and avoid a long discussion. She said have a nice day and motioned me on my way. I smiled internally and eased on down the road.

Would she have responded to me differently if my license read "John smith" or some other Eurasian name, not Nana Kwaku Opare? Not being a native Tanzanian the fact I carry an Afrikan name on my documents makes a clear statement that I define myself as Afrikan and that makes difference in how I am perceived and treated. I'm not simply mzungu. And that feels great.

That's all fine and dandy, commendable. I respect that. A name change, especially as an adult, is a personal decision because a lot has to be taken into consideration. I have weighed all of what you said years ago, the benefit of having the name on all documents is nice, you get a peace of mind in the end, I get it. I began the legal name change process but then my conscience would not allow me to proceed, because then I ask myself "Am I really reclaiming my Afrikan identity, or am I relying on the government to determine that?". Why am I "asking" (petitioning) the government to claim this Afrikan name? Why should I wait (so long) for their approval? So they're going to fingerprint and check my criminal history, what about the crimes they have committed against my people? They're going to see what tax debts I owe, what about the debts and reparations they owe to me? Did my ancestors who were enslaved have to go through this process to get their master's name? If something doesn't seem or just plain isn't right, I will not do it. I'm just wired that way.

I don't need my Afrikan name to appear on a US document in order feel that I have an Afrikan identity, feel good about myself, have a peace of mind, etc. I chose my name to bring about a new Afrikan consciousness within myself and family and construct a new paradigm. I am who I am. The change starts with me and I am laying the foundation, don't need Uncle Sam's help for that. I named myself to chart mine and my family's destiny and orientation, of which the US government has little to do with. It's the authority I am taking over my life. I'm not expecting you or anyone to understand now. And I don't think less of anyone who have gone through the legal name change process, to each his own. Wishing you peace, blessings and abundance.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 8:14 am
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

RealRADIOTalk;256114 wrote: African names are just as good as the slave names. Why not make a change?. Good food for thought [emoji189]

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

Not sure understand this statement. First issue is normally when we say something is just as good as another thing it assumes that latter is the standard or bar and the replacement is a viable substitute in lieu of it. Meaning you seek the standard but settle for "just as good". But to have the latter is better. Second is this the implied notion that Afrikan name are somehow equal to eurasian name. As if to say it's "just" a name.

If we had to rephrase this how would you restate it possibly?

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 16/11/2017 8:29 am
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

I also explained in the first paragraph all that ok?. Dr Ben used his slave name and he done very well.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:35 pm
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

Please stop put void assumptions in my mouth

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:36 pm
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

You reading a portion of my message. Please stop

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:37 pm
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

Let me give you a clearance. I am saying : if African names are just as good as the slave names: why not make the change ... meaning —- then ones should change to the African Name. I hope you get it now???... and changing your name is good ; which I explained already in the prior statement I made etc... people change their name and their Heart ❤️ is not always good.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:43 pm
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

And I have no reason to rephrase anything, you need to read with overstanding and with clearance. I don’t see how you are confused with my statement, and expect me to rephrase???. Because you lacking understanding? Of what I am saying.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:45 pm
(@realradiotalk)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

Lol. And I reading it again . That’s YOU not getting it.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/11/2017 12:49 pm
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

RealRADIOTalk;256380 wrote: I also explained in the first paragraph all that ok?. Dr Ben used his slave name and he done very well.

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

Only part I was referring to was the quote...

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 16/11/2017 12:51 pm
Page 2 / 3

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share:

Sign up for this exclusive Abibitumi Saturday Seminar Series with the one and only Ɔbenfo (Prof) Baba James Small and prepare to go from information to transformation in terms of your daily choices in the interest of Kmtyw (Black people) and Kmt (the Land of Black people).
X
X
X
X