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[Sticky] Video: Parallels between Akan Ananse Stories and Yorùbá Ìjàpá Tales

(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

'"

    \n".self::process_list_items("'.str_replace('
    ', '', '[*]Dr. Ọbádélé Kambon: Parallels between Akan Ananse Stories and Yorùbá Ìjàpá Tales: Structure, Function, Content and Worldview

    December 4, 2014: 9:00AM

    In Dr. Kwame Nkrumah’s 1963 “African Genius” speech inaugurating the official opening of the Institute of African Studies (IAS), professors and lecturers were exhorted to pursue the study of Africa – beyond arbitrary territorial or regional boundaries – in new African-centred ways to reveal Africa’s underlying unity. How can Ananse and Ìjàpá stories be understood within an African framework of deep thought “in entire freedom from the propositions and pre-suppositions of the colonial epoch” or “neo-colonial” epoch, as it were, as required by Nkrumah? In this presentation, we reveal connections with regard to the worldview, structure, function and content of Akan and Yorùbá stories using dikenga, the cosmogram of the Bakôngo, as a tool for oral literary analysis revealing intertextual parallels through space and time. We highlight six (6) sets of stories common to both Akan and Yorùbá people differentiated simply by the main character being the spider or the tortoise. Further, we show how the stages of transformation of any story can be gainfully analysed using the proposed dikenga theory of literary analysis. We find that this approach can be generalized to shift our concepts of “storylines” and “timelines” to reveal the patterned and cyclical nature of material and immaterial phenomena for, according to Kôngo teaching, “nothing exists that does not follow the steps of the cyclical Kongo cosmogram” (Fu-Kiau 1994).

    Disclaimer: The views expressed here are solely those of the presenter in his private capacity and do not necessarily represent the views of the Institute of African Studies').'")."\n

"'

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Topic starter Posted : 12/12/2014 7:16 pm
(@tenkamenin)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Phenomenal presentation!

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Posted : 12/12/2014 10:28 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Meda ase. Mebɔɔ me ho mmɔden!

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Topic starter Posted : 13/12/2014 1:37 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin


Greetings Colleagues!
Well, they say all good things must come to an end. In our case, good things must come to a pause as we adjourn our landmark IAS Weekly Thursday Seminar Series until next semester.
But luckily, you can re-live the experience through the YouTube videos that we have magnanimously provided for the edification of the University Community and the Global Community at large!
Notably, you can check our most recent video from a promising young up-and-coming scholar named Dr. Ọbádélé Kambon. ;o)
Indeed, over the course of the past fortnight or so, several colleagues came up to me saying that they anticipated my seminar presentation entitled Parallels between Akan Ananse Stories and Yorùbá Ìjàpá Tales: Worldview, Structure, Function and Content thinking that it would be "unique", "special", "different" and "soronko". Given feedback thus far, attendees were not dissappointed.
Part of what made it unique and special was our wonderful and praiseworthy Chair, Professor Esi Sutherland-Addy. I would like to extend a personal thanks to her for doing an excellent job Chairing the seminar and giving wonderful input!
If you were not able to attend this last seminar of the semester in person, feel free to "attend" now by checking out the YouTube video.

Once you view the video feel free to add to feedback on my Seminar by downloading, filling out and sending back this FEEDBACK FORM from our OFFICIAL IAS Google Drive https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIaVhiOVZBbU9qVEE/view?usp=sharing
You can also give feedback on any other seminar presentation video by clicking the images below to link to our playlist and clicking the link below each image to access the specific feedback form for each specific presentation. Kindly send your form to me and I will make sure it is forwarded to the presenter in question.

Hoekema Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgINVBLaEhKTjJhS0U/view?usp=sharing

Ayesu Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgINjYtR2hsSnFEQTA/view?usp=sharing

Akrofi Ansah Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIMVYxRHFJMWtMQk0/view?usp=sharing

Anyidoho / Adomako Ampofo Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIM2NRX0huN2RqZUE/view?usp=sharing

Nanbigne / Darku Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIQ3pENHJtSk9yOXc/view?usp=sharing

Ntewusu Aniegye Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIWjRKNkpJLU1wVDQ/view?usp=sharing

Opoku Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIRWk1Ry16MzIyTlU/view?usp=sharing

Perbi Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIeFA2aFJ0YlFPeTg/view?usp=sharing

Odotei Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIUklzcWswa0M0MjQ/view?usp=sharing

Asante Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIRzdURXkzbEVsaTA/view?usp=sharing

Nanbigne / Nii-Dortey Seminar Feedback Form: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B44QKx1FlxgIdnV4VVBmQVhFZ1k/view?usp=sharing


Additionally, we would like to thank Fidelia Serwaa Ametewee of our in-house IAS Media and Visual Arts Section for an excellent semester with unparalleled editing, Selina Emma Laryea on the excellent photos, Ben-Mills Lamptey for assisting with production and our resident ICT Guru Mr. Ekow Arthur-Entsiwah for assisting in streaming to our growing crowd of live viewers via Skype each week! You all have made this a successful and glorious semester!!!
Also, below, kindly find highlight slides from the IAS Seminar Report given to Fellows earlier today including our attendance and feedback.






As you can see above, this semester alone, we have touched the lives of over 2,345 people with our unique scholarship via physical attendance and virtual attendance. As such, on behalf of all of us here at IAS , we would like to thank each and every one of the 2,345+ people who, over the course of the semester, have watched and shared our fresh and new IAS video productions at our official YouTube channel playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOm27d8Jg2g&list=PL5anwAaEOVs6g2szyZVuAdEsnjrMYDPji&index=1
or at our IAS website here: http://ias.ug.edu.gh/index.php/component/content/article/34-at-ias/announcements-events/325-ias-thursday-seminar


Excited about what IAS has been up to? Well, next semester, the Institute of African Studies will continue our two innovative and cutting-edge initiatives with regard to our Thursday Seminar Series:

'"

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    ', '', '
    [*]Seminars will be streamed live online through Skype
    [*]Seminars will be recorded and posted on YouTube​
    ').'")."\n

"'


Don't miss it as IAS continues to extend our collective work by highlighting how all disciplines are relevant to Africa and how Africa is relevant to all disciplines.
Until then, take care and I look forward to seeing you again next semester at the INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN STUDIES WEEKLY THURSDAY SEMINAR SERIES!!!



Thanks and once again, we'll see you soon physically or virtually at the Institute of African Studies for next semester's captivating Thursday Seminar Series and more!
Best regards,

Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD
Research Fellow - Language, Literature and Drama Section
Institute of African Studies
University of Ghana - Legon
Room 115 IAS Kwame Nkrumah Complex
Phone: 0249195150 | 0240872928
Email: [email protected]

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Topic starter Posted : 13/12/2014 2:29 am
(@agya_kwaku)
BlackTacular Kmty Admin

Meda ase, That was a good presentation.

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Posted : 14/12/2014 4:47 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

@Agya Kwaku, Meda ase pa ara!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 21/12/2014 2:35 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

[h=1]AKAN ANANSE STORIES, YORÙBÁ ÌJÀPÁ TALES, AND THE DIKÈNGA THEORY: WORLDVIEW AND STRUCTURE[1][/h]
Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD[2]

ABSTRACT

Is it possible to use endogenous African cosmological, philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks to analyze indigenous African phenomena? Why should one even try? In this article, it is argued that such analyses are not only possible and plausible, but they are imperative. It is further argued that just such frameworks can add insight to our understanding of the structure of Akan Ananse and Yorùbá Ìjàpá stories and the shared African worldview from which they arise. According to Fu-Kiau, “nothing exists that does not follow the steps of the cyclical Kongo cosmogram” (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). This bold hypothesis is tested in this study by applying Dikènga, the cosmogram of the Bakôngo, to an oral (and/or written) literary analysis of the structure of Akan and Yorùbá stories. This application is what we term the “Dikènga theory of literary analysis.” We find that this theoretical framework can help us shift away from concepts of “storylines” and “timelines” to reveal the patterned and cyclical nature of material and immaterial phenomena and to deepen our understanding of these stories as manifestations of a shared African worldview.

Keywords: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, worldview, structure

RÉSUMÉ

Est-il possible d’utiliser cosmologique endogène africaine, philosophique, théorique et cadres conceptuels pour analyser les phénomènes indigènes africains? Pourquoi devrait-on même essayer? Dans cet article, il est soutenu que ces analyses ne sont pas seulement possible et plausible, mais ils sont impératifs. Il est en outre fait valoir que seulement ces cadres peuvent ajouter un aperçu à notre compréhension de la structure des Akan Ananse et Yorùbá Ìjàpá contes et la vision du monde africaine partagée à partir de laquelle ils se produisent. Selon Fu-Kiau, «existe rien qui ne suit pas les étapes de la cosmogramme Kongo cyclique» (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). Cette hypothèse audacieuse est testée dans cette étude en appliquant Dikènga, le cosmogramme des Bakongo, à un oral (et / ou écrite) analyse littéraire de la structure des contes Akan et Yoruba. Cette application est ce que nous appelons la «théorie Dikènga de l’analyse littéraire.» Nous constatons que ce cadre théorique peut nous aider à se détourner des concepts de «scénarios» et «calendriers» pour révéler la nature à motifs et cyclique des phénomènes matériels et immatériels et approfondir notre compréhension de ces contes comme des manifestations d’une cosmologie africaine partagée.

Mots-clés: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, cosmologie, structure

[HR][/HR][1] This article is dedicated to the loving memory of my late Kikôngo teacher, N’kulu Kimbwandende kia Bunseki Fu-Kiâu, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice,’ and the late Baba Henry Ervin Van Kirksey, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice.’

[2] Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD is a Research Fellow in the Language, Literature and Drama Section at the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana, Legon. He can be contacted at [email protected]

Attached files

ananseijapa-cjas-proof.pdf (2 MB) 

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 02/11/2016 7:13 am
(@tenkamenin)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;206208 wrote: AKAN ANANSE STORIES, YORÙBÁ ÌJÀPÁ TALES, AND THE DIKÈNGA THEORY: WORLDVIEW AND STRUCTURE[1]

Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD[2]

ABSTRACT

Is it possible to use endogenous African cosmological, philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks to analyze indigenous African phenomena? Why should one even try? In this article, it is argued that such analyses are not only possible and plausible, but they are imperative. It is further argued that just such frameworks can add insight to our understanding of the structure of Akan Ananse and Yorùbá Ìjàpá stories and the shared African worldview from which they arise. According to Fu-Kiau, “nothing exists that does not follow the steps of the cyclical Kongo cosmogram” (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). This bold hypothesis is tested in this study by applying Dikènga, the cosmogram of the Bakôngo, to an oral (and/or written) literary analysis of the structure of Akan and Yorùbá stories. This application is what we term the “Dikènga theory of literary analysis.” We find that this theoretical framework can help us shift away from concepts of “storylines” and “timelines” to reveal the patterned and cyclical nature of material and immaterial phenomena and to deepen our understanding of these stories as manifestations of a shared African worldview.

Keywords: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, worldview, structure

RÉSUMÉ

Est-il possible d’utiliser cosmologique endogène africaine, philosophique, théorique et cadres conceptuels pour analyser les phénomènes indigènes africains? Pourquoi devrait-on même essayer? Dans cet article, il est soutenu que ces analyses ne sont pas seulement possible et plausible, mais ils sont impératifs. Il est en outre fait valoir que seulement ces cadres peuvent ajouter un aperçu à notre compréhension de la structure des Akan Ananse et Yorùbá Ìjàpá contes et la vision du monde africaine partagée à partir de laquelle ils se produisent. Selon Fu-Kiau, «existe rien qui ne suit pas les étapes de la cosmogramme Kongo cyclique» (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). Cette hypothèse audacieuse est testée dans cette étude en appliquant Dikènga, le cosmogramme des Bakongo, à un oral (et / ou écrite) analyse littéraire de la structure des contes Akan et Yoruba. Cette application est ce que nous appelons la «théorie Dikènga de l’analyse littéraire.» Nous constatons que ce cadre théorique peut nous aider à se détourner des concepts de «scénarios» et «calendriers» pour révéler la nature à motifs et cyclique des phénomènes matériels et immatériels et approfondir notre compréhension de ces contes comme des manifestations d’une cosmologie africaine partagée.

Mots-clés: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, cosmologie, structure

[HR][/HR][1] This article is dedicated to the loving memory of my late Kikôngo teacher, N’kulu Kimbwandende kia Bunseki Fu-Kiâu, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice,’ and the late Baba Henry Ervin Van Kirksey, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice.’

[2] Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD is a Research Fellow in the Language, Literature and Drama Section at the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana, Legon. He can be contacted at [email protected]

Thanks for sharing this excellent paper. It gives us in different professions an idea of how to apply Dikenga in what we do. Also thanks for the Twi translations of the various Dikenga stages, I nailed all the terms except Ɔdasuom.

Professionally, I've been thinking about Dikenga and its application in analyzing the business cycle, and funding deals. Through experience, I've always been weary of people who rush from Musoni to Kala. My experience with firms that fail is that they're are two critical missteps, 1) Firms that fail spend a short amount of time in the Musoni stage getting feedback, researching, and developing their core principles to guide their company. 2) They do not seek blessing or support to enter into Kala/Emerging/Startup Stage.

Traditionally, to move from Musoni to Kala, the "nkra" is well defined, and support from Nananom Nsamanfoɔ is affirmed.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/11/2016 1:28 pm
(@tenkamenin)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;206208 wrote: AKAN ANANSE STORIES, YORÙBÁ ÌJÀPÁ TALES, AND THE DIKÈNGA THEORY: WORLDVIEW AND STRUCTURE[1]

Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD[2]

ABSTRACT

Is it possible to use endogenous African cosmological, philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks to analyze indigenous African phenomena? Why should one even try? In this article, it is argued that such analyses are not only possible and plausible, but they are imperative. It is further argued that just such frameworks can add insight to our understanding of the structure of Akan Ananse and Yorùbá Ìjàpá stories and the shared African worldview from which they arise. According to Fu-Kiau, “nothing exists that does not follow the steps of the cyclical Kongo cosmogram” (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). This bold hypothesis is tested in this study by applying Dikènga, the cosmogram of the Bakôngo, to an oral (and/or written) literary analysis of the structure of Akan and Yorùbá stories. This application is what we term the “Dikènga theory of literary analysis.” We find that this theoretical framework can help us shift away from concepts of “storylines” and “timelines” to reveal the patterned and cyclical nature of material and immaterial phenomena and to deepen our understanding of these stories as manifestations of a shared African worldview.

Keywords: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, worldview, structure

RÉSUMÉ

Est-il possible d’utiliser cosmologique endogène africaine, philosophique, théorique et cadres conceptuels pour analyser les phénomènes indigènes africains? Pourquoi devrait-on même essayer? Dans cet article, il est soutenu que ces analyses ne sont pas seulement possible et plausible, mais ils sont impératifs. Il est en outre fait valoir que seulement ces cadres peuvent ajouter un aperçu à notre compréhension de la structure des Akan Ananse et Yorùbá Ìjàpá contes et la vision du monde africaine partagée à partir de laquelle ils se produisent. Selon Fu-Kiau, «existe rien qui ne suit pas les étapes de la cosmogramme Kongo cyclique» (Fu-Kiau 1994: 26). Cette hypothèse audacieuse est testée dans cette étude en appliquant Dikènga, le cosmogramme des Bakongo, à un oral (et / ou écrite) analyse littéraire de la structure des contes Akan et Yoruba. Cette application est ce que nous appelons la «théorie Dikènga de l’analyse littéraire.» Nous constatons que ce cadre théorique peut nous aider à se détourner des concepts de «scénarios» et «calendriers» pour révéler la nature à motifs et cyclique des phénomènes matériels et immatériels et approfondir notre compréhension de ces contes comme des manifestations d’une cosmologie africaine partagée.

Mots-clés: Ananse, Ìjàpá, Dikènga, cosmologie, structure

[HR][/HR][1] This article is dedicated to the loving memory of my late Kikôngo teacher, N’kulu Kimbwandende kia Bunseki Fu-Kiâu, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice,’ and the late Baba Henry Ervin Van Kirksey, mȝˁ ḫrw ‘true of voice.’

[2] Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD is a Research Fellow in the Language, Literature and Drama Section at the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana, Legon. He can be contacted at [email protected]

Thanks for sharing this excellent paper. It shows us in different professions how to apply Dikenga in what we do. Also thanks for the Twi translations of the various Dikenga stages, I nailed all the terms except Ɔdasuom.

Professionally, I've been thinking about Dikenga and its application in analyzing the business cycle, and funding deals. Through experience, I've always been weary of people who rush from Musoni to Kala. I've noticed 2 critical missteps with firms that fail,

1) Firms that fail spend a short amount of time in the Musoni stage researching, getting feedback, and developing their core principles to guide their company.

2) They do not seek blessing or support from the wise/experienced to enter into Kala/Emerging/Startup Stage.

Traditionally, to move from Musoni to Kala, the "nkra" is well defined, and support from Nananom Nsamanfoɔ is affirmed.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/11/2016 1:28 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Tenkamenin;206632 wrote: Thanks for sharing this excellent paper. It shows us in different professions how to apply Dikenga in what we do. Also thanks for the Twi translations of the various Dikenga stages, I nailed all the terms except Ɔdasuom.

Professionally, I've been thinking about Dikenga and its application in analyzing the business cycle, and funding deals. Through experience, I've always been weary of people who rush from Musoni to Kala. I've noticed 2 critical missteps with firms that fail,

1) Firms that fail spend a short amount of time in the Musoni stage researching, getting feedback, and developing their core principles to guide their company.

2) They do not seek blessing or support from the wise/experienced to enter into Kala/Emerging/Startup Stage.

Traditionally, to move from Musoni to Kala, the "nkra" is well defined, and support from Nananom Nsamanfoɔ is affirmed.

I'm glad you appreciated it. I look forward to the journal article coming out. I decided to make this pre-press manuscript available because I'm eager to get some of the ideas out there in the world now that it's been accepted. The reviewer of the article said that it was his first time hearing or reading anyone go beyond just a description of the dikènga ethnographically to actually employ dikènga to describe any type of phenomenon in the world. I'm intrigued by your analysis and application to the business cycle. This could probably be another article in which the dikènga could be deployed to get us to actually use our own models, theories and ideas to act in the world as opposed to just describing them for the sake of Europeans or others to prove that black people have done something worthwhile and that we're really human beings. If we have any ideas that are worthwhile, we should be able to use those ideas to implement in our day-to-day lives and understandings of the world. Let's discuss your ideas about the business cycle more.

Sent from my GHANA-MADE RLG Uhuru Accu BrilliantPhone using the NEW Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 06/11/2016 2:22 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

This was the full review, which, I think, helped enrich the paper as I addressed/incorporated the reviewer's points:

Re: Review of “Akan Ananse Stories, Yorùbá Ìjàpá Tales, and The Dikènga Theory: Worldview and Structure” Dear Dr. Awedoba: I am writing this letter in response to your invitation to review the above-titled article for possible publication in the Contemporary Journal of African Studies. At the outset, I should inform you that I have limited knowledge of Kikongo, but no understanding of the Akan or Yorùbá languages. Secondly, I am not a literary theorist, so I am not the best reviewer if you want an assessment of the article from that perspective. I am a legal scholar, with a background in legal and general philosophy, critical theory and African-centered thought. I also had a close professional relationship with the chief scholar that the author relies on in the paper, Kimbwandènde Kia Bunseki Fu-Kiau. To be forthright, I believe this is an outstanding paper. The author uses a clear writing style and wastes no verbiage in making his points. More importantly, the author displays a deep knowledge of Bântu-Kôngo axiology and ontology and deploys them in a very creative and novel fashion. Most of the works that I have seen on the Dikènga are descriptive, and approach the subject in an anthropological way. This article marks the first time that I have seen the Dikènga deployed as theory, as a means to interrogate and explain phenomenon within a distinct discipline. What the author proposes here is a “Dikènga Theory of Oral Literary Structure.” The author argues that the cyclical time progression demonstrated in the Dikènga explains the structure and sequence of oral Akan and Yorùbá folktales. Importantly, the author suggests that this explanatory connection is the consequence two realities. First, the Dikènga has a universal character; it applies to all things in existence (p. 4). Second, and in a seeming contradiction to the first point, there is a deep cultural similarity between the Central African Bakôngo ethnic group and the West African Akan and Yorùbá ethnic groups. Thus, the concepts expressed in the Dikènga “are common throughout Africa and can even be found in other parts of the Global African World” (p. 7). The Dikènga is symbol that is used by the Bântu-Kôngo to express a complex ontology. In its’ simplest version, this ontology holds that all things in existence are created, grow, decline and go out of existence. The author gives a very detailed and precise description of the Dikènga philosophy (pp. 5-6, 11-13) and then applies it to Akan and Yorùbá folk tales to show that they also follow this pattern. Standing on its own, this similarity would be unremarkable. For, as the author points out, traditional literary analysis has always held that stories had a beginning, middle, and end (Freytag’s exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and denouement, p. 5). But, as the author points out, the Dikènga adds something different. The Dikènga suggests that the progression of a narrative is not linear, but cyclical (pp. 22-23). Thus a story may be remembered and repeated, which is the recycling of the story along the pathways of the Dikènga (p. 23). The author also notes the significance of the Kalûnga line, which divides the top half of the Dikènga from the bottom half. Above the Kalûnga line is Ku nseke, the land of the living. Below is Ku mpemba, the land of the dead. The author notes that when a story is not performed it is “dead,” or in suspended animation, until the next time it is narrated (p. 20). According to the author, the Kalûnga line may also divide the story as an abstraction from the concrete realities that the story relates or the political/social reactions the story engenders (p. 21). Although the author does not note this, one could also say, consistent with Dikènga theory, that oral narration or performance of a story would be in the upper world and the written form of the story would reside below the Kalûnga line. Many African-centered scholars have noted the similarities between Bakôngo solar philosophical concepts and those in Kemet or Ancient Egypt. The author discusses how the different manifestations of Re (Ra) matches up with the four moments of the sun described in the Dikènga theory (p. 18). I have two comments about this connection that the author can either accept or reject. First, I am not sure I would equate Wosir (Osiris) with the Musoni position. It is true that Wosir is the Neter (god) of the underworld, but Wosir’s association with the solar cycle (coming late as it did in the New Kingdom) is possibly a consequence of Wosir’s assimilation of many of the attributes of Sokar (or Seker), an earlier lord of the Underworld. Sokar/Seker is generally understood to be a solar divinity. Second, in the Dikènga, Kala, where the sun rises, is on the right and Luvèmba, where the sun sets is on the left. These positions are reversed in the Nile Valley iconography. The author relates to this when he asks, “why in the Kôngo, the Dikènga cycle is depicted as moving in a ‘counter-clockwise’ fashion while in Kmt, the cycle moves in a ‘clockwise’ fashion” (p. 19). His explanation that constellations precess in a counter clockwise direction and that “counter-clockwise movements may have something to do with being in alignment with the cosmos on a very deep level” (p. 20) provides a less than satisfactory answer. I think these differences are the result of the ecliptic being located in the northern sky in the southern hemisphere and in the southern sky in the northern hemisphere where the Nile Valley is located. From the position of a person in the Nile Valley, facing the pathway of the sun, it would rise on the left and set on the right. From the position of a person in the Congo Valley, the sun would rise on the right and set on the left.
These last two points involve minor matters that do not detract from the overall value of the article as an exposition of the Bakôngo world view and as a creative application of that worldview as a methodology for understanding the cultural productivity of Africa “in new African-centred ways.” I urge you to publish this piece. I’m sure Nkrumah would be proud.

Given his high recommendation for its publication, I should be grateful if you could prepare the paper for publication in CJAS vol. 4.2.

Albert K. Awedoba
Editor, CJAS

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 06/11/2016 3:01 am
(@tenkamenin)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;206737 wrote: I'm glad you appreciated it. I look forward to the journal article coming out. I decided to make this pre-press manuscript available because I'm eager to get some of the ideas out there in the world now that it's been accepted. The reviewer of the article said that it was his first time hearing or reading anyone go beyond just a description of the dikènga ethnographically to actually employ dikènga to describe any type of phenomenon in the world. I'm intrigued by your analysis and application to the business cycle. This could probably be another article in which the dikènga could be deployed to get us to actually use our own models, theories and ideas to act in the world as opposed to just describing them for the sake of Europeans or others to prove that black people have done something worthwhile and that we're really human beings. If we have any ideas that are worthwhile, we should be able to use those ideas to implement in our day-to-day lives and understandings of the world. Let's discuss your ideas about the business cycle more.

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DIkenga aligns perfectly in the business world, and I intend on helping a brotha that frequents my office understand why he's struggling through the Dikenga Framework. Unfortunately, it will not be easy to deliver the news since he's a bit sensitive. However the Dikenga model will soften the hard news because he will visually see Tukula and how to be in that zone. I will look towards publishing an article in a financial journal about this model.

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Posted : 07/11/2016 8:54 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Sounds good. Let's collaborate on that article!

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Topic starter Posted : 09/11/2016 3:18 am
(@omegared)
BlackTastic Kmty Registered

This help me out a lot as I'm studying this currently.

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Posted : 05/07/2017 7:31 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

omegared;240191 wrote: This help me out a lot as I'm studying this currently.

Glad to help out.

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Topic starter Posted : 05/07/2017 1:55 pm

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