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(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin


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    [*]20th Anniversary of UNESCO Slave Route Project Talk
    Dr. Obadele Kambon
    28th July, 2014
    Institute of African Studies
    Kwabena Nketia Conference Hall

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1foJ9r4E7Tk

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Topic starter Posted : 29/07/2014 1:22 pm
Prentice Perry says Blacktastic
 Nana
(@nana)
BlackDerful Kmty Registered

Excellent presentation

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Posted : 29/07/2014 6:53 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Nana, meda ase!

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Topic starter Posted : 30/07/2014 2:42 pm
(@EnlightenedSon)
BlackTastic Kmty Registered

Very informative and a much needed presentation.

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Posted : 29/08/2014 10:42 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Thanks!

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Topic starter Posted : 03/09/2014 11:06 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

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Topic starter Posted : 21/03/2015 6:39 am
Prentice Perry says Blacktastic
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Legacies and the Impact of Trans-Atlantic Enslavement on the Diaspora
by
Ọbádélé Kambon, Ph.D. [email protected]
Research Fellow, Language, Literature and Drama Section, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon

Abstract
When we discuss the legacies and impact of trans-Atlantic enslavement on the Diaspora, we must consider several issues. Among these is the tendency of the word “legacy” to have a positive connotation for many – where the enslavement of African people may fail with regard to this criterion. More importantly, in this paper, I would like to draw the reader’s attention to the fact that in many places, such as the United States, slavery has never been abolished by law, merely renamed. As such, it becomes difficult to discuss a legacy or aftermath of something that is still in progress. Therefore, we will take the United States as a case study of slavery changing names/forms yet remaining essentially the same in spirit and nature if not worse in terms of impact on African1 people.
Keywords: neo-slavery, legacy, impact, enslaved, routes

Attached files

8.7-5-Obadele.pdf (169.7 KB) 

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Topic starter Posted : 02/11/2016 7:55 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1foJ9r4E7Tk

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Topic starter Posted : 13/01/2017 3:58 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

What: Staying Alive: Slavery, Neo-slavery, Repatriation & the Myth of Africa's Past - A Ghana @ 60 anniversary public lecture with Mawuli Adjei, PhD & Ọbádélé Kambon, PhD (Hunter "Huntered" seminar series Part 1)
When: 6th March 2017 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Where: Accra [Dot] Alt Radio, Brazil House (Jamestown)
Cost: Admission is FREE, value is PRICELESS
For more enquiries call: 0577172884 | 0249195150 | 0242125591
Kindly find the article upon which my talk will be based attached. It deals with neo-enslavement in the US.
The original article appeared in 2015 in the Journal of Pan-African Studies. The article, in turn, was based on this talk given in 2014: https://www.abibitumikasa.com/forums/showthread.php/110667


Kambon, O. (2015). Legacies and the Impact of Trans-Atlantic Enslavement on the Diaspora. Journal of Pan African Studies, 8(7), 23-44.
Available as a free download here:
http://www.jpanafrican.org/vol8no7.htm
http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/7435
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283453178_Legacies_and_the_Impact_of_Trans-Atlantic_Enslavement_on_the_Diaspora?ev=prf_pub
https://www.academia.edu/17673240/Legacies_and_the_Impact_of_Trans-Atlantic_Enslavement_on_the_Diaspora


ABSTRACT: When we discuss the legacies and impact of trans-Atlantic enslavement on the Diaspora, we must consider several issues. Among these is the tendency of the word “legacy” to have a positive connotation for many – where the enslavement of African people may fail with regard to this criterion. More importantly, in this paper I would like to draw the reader’s attention to the fact that in many places, such as the United States, slavery has never been abolished by law, merely renamed. As such, it becomes difficult to discuss a legacy or aftermath of something that is still in progress. Therefore, we will take the United States as a case study of slavery changing names/forms yet remaining essentially the same in spirit and nature if not worse in terms of impact on African people.

Attached files

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Topic starter Posted : 06/03/2017 3:06 am
(@kevintest)
BlackTastic Kmty Admin

Blackpowerful!

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Posted : 04/07/2018 3:22 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

@kevlew, You read it or viewed it or both?

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Topic starter Posted : 04/07/2018 9:02 am
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

 Both. 

I am reminded of a few quotes to respond to each section

 

1. Legacy - you stated that this work usually connotes something positive that is passed on. It also assumes that thing which is passed on in some way is beneficial or that there is a benefactor.  Why else would it be “passed on” from generation to generation to create a “legacy”. Usually a “legacy” is an intentional thing that is supported by many to accomplish as well. A person cannot create a “legacy” alone without some sort of support.  

You then show that the word also has a rarely used connotation of negativity.  This is supported by examples of this usage.  

What I thought after reading this section was a quote by Nana Wade Nobles - “Power is the ability to define reality and to convince other people that it is their definition.” ~Dr. Wade Nobles

with this quote I attribute the fact that the members that organized the event and used this term “legacy” has obviously had the power of definition manipulated, miseducated, intentionally anti-Afrikan based.  In the case of this term and used in the context as stated for the event, it is clear that they intended to say that the event (Maafa) was some sort of thing that was passed down.  Question is who is the benefactor.  

 

Associated with this term as you mentioned it assumes that it has ended when clearly it has not (slavery and it’s “legacy” for the ones who benefit). When we examine the rationale used from eurasians to enslave another human we can clearly see as Amos Wilson calls it - te constants.  Thing changed to remain the same.  Another point is the subtle way in which somehow it seeks to isolate the experience of a segment of Afrikans from others and have our perspective view the Maafa in segments then to try and say it has ended.  Afrikans to this day are being enslaved on the continent, in the us in prisons as mentioned, in Papau New Guinea, India, Israel, Saudi Arabia...world wide. To your point, the enslavement of Afrikans has been an ongoing thing and we should avoid falling into the eurasian trap of defining history from their eposidal perspective (wars....and the enslavement of Afrikans is an act of war). Usually they say Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Alamo, Civil War, WWI and II...but somehow when the aggressive act committed against mankind it is defined as “trade”.  In Merriam-Webster one of the definitions of war is -   : a state of hostility, conflict, or antagonism.  When we extended this to spiritual, physical, economical, agricultural, psychological, and mental hostility that picture becomes clearer as these are constant wars waged worldwide against Afrikans daily.  

“For the powerful, crimes are those that others commit.” ~Noam Chomsky

Again the power to define reality  needs to be revisited.  

 

The remaining cited examples of how this act of hostility against Afrikan people worldwide demonstrate that it has never ended.  From pig laws, convict leasing, vagrant laws, and several more war tactics show clearly that the use of the term “legacy” is erroneous either definition.

@obadelekambon

j

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Posted : 04/07/2018 10:58 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin
Posted by: Kwadwo

 Both. 

I am reminded of a few quotes to respond to each section

 

1. Legacy - you stated that this work usually connotes something positive that is passed on. It also assumes that thing which is passed on in some way is beneficial or that there is a benefactor.  Why else would it be “passed on” from generation to generation to create a “legacy”. Usually a “legacy” is an intentional thing that is supported by many to accomplish as well. A person cannot create a “legacy” alone without some sort of support.  

You then show that the word also has a rarely used connotation of negativity.  This is supported by examples of this usage.  

What I thought after reading this section was a quote by Nana Wade Nobles - “Power is the ability to define reality and to convince other people that it is their definition.” ~Dr. Wade Nobles

with this quote I attribute the fact that the members that organized the event and used this term “legacy” has obviously had the power of definition manipulated, miseducated, intentionally anti-Afrikan based.  In the case of this term and used in the context as stated for the event, it is clear that they intended to say that the event (Maafa) was some sort of thing that was passed down.  Question is who is the benefactor.  

 

Associated with this term as you mentioned it assumes that it has ended when clearly it has not (slavery and it’s “legacy” for the ones who benefit). When we examine the rationale used from eurasians to enslave another human we can clearly see as Amos Wilson calls it - te constants.  Thing changed to remain the same.  Another point is the subtle way in which somehow it seeks to isolate the experience of a segment of Afrikans from others and have our perspective view the Maafa in segments then to try and say it has ended.  Afrikans to this day are being enslaved on the continent, in the us in prisons as mentioned, in Papau New Guinea, India, Israel, Saudi Arabia...world wide. To your point, the enslavement of Afrikans has been an ongoing thing and we should avoid falling into the eurasian trap of defining history from their eposidal perspective (wars....and the enslavement of Afrikans is an act of war). Usually they say Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Alamo, Civil War, WWI and II...but somehow when the aggressive act committed against mankind it is defined as “trade”.  In Merriam-Webster one of the definitions of war is -   : a state of hostility, conflict, or antagonism.  When we extended this to spiritual, physical, economical, agricultural, psychological, and mental hostility that picture becomes clearer as these are constant wars waged worldwide against Afrikans daily.  

“For the powerful, crimes are those that others commit.” ~Noam Chomsky

Again the power to define reality  needs to be revisited.  

 

The remaining cited examples of how this act of hostility against Afrikan people worldwide demonstrate that it has never ended.  From pig laws, convict leasing, vagrant laws, and several more war tactics show clearly that the use of the term “legacy” is erroneous either definition.

@obadelekambon

j

I appreciate the detailed feedback. As Chinweizu says, wrong terminology can have a child thinking a poisonous snake is a rope. Interestingly enough, 13th, by Ava Duvernay, came out after this, making similar points in terms of the 13th amendment permanently enshrining enslavement in the united snakkkes. I wonder if she read the article. 

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Topic starter Posted : 05/07/2018 3:15 am
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

I recall that quote by Chinweizu.  I have to remember that one.  13th was decent.  She seemed to have read New Jim Crow lol or Worse Than Slavery. 

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Posted : 05/07/2018 6:59 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

True. I have to compile some of these into a book, by the way. 

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Topic starter Posted : 06/07/2018 4:11 am
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June 16th the Kambon family had a major family emergency.  Dr. Kambon’s wife Kala and children were involved in a serious car accident and admitted to the hospital.   All are doing well and recovering.

The family’s only mode of transportation was totaled in the accident.

We are asking for the support of Abibitumi family to assist the Kambon family during this trying time.    

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