Forum

How did you come to...
 
Notifications
Clear all

[Sticky] How did you come to be an Afrikan with sense?

Page 1 / 3
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Were you born into an Afrikan family? Did you have a jolting wake-up call? A book? A lecture? Share it here!

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 01/02/2011 1:40 am
(@abstractliving)
New Kmty Registered

Abibifahodie Okyeame!

Your assertive nature is brilliantly warming/illuminating/empowering. Gratuity, for your expression of urgency/commitment/vision, truly/ineffably your deliverance translate precisely and is received!

How did you come to be an Afrikan with sense?

Were you born into an Afrikan family? Did you have a jolting wake-up call? A book? A lecture? Share it here!

Education from infancy was self reliant in orientation, for me, creating an early protection against being gullible or susceptible to adopting unproven/inexperienced concepts/beliefs. This was foundational to exploration for/of truth while growing/learning/living. I have all-ways felt invigorated/blissful/enthusiastic about living and discovering what is my nature/natural self. Tyranny's concepts of beauty/success/behavior corrupted my consciousness as much as the next. Yet, eventually I became fascinated with Afrikan people. Noticing as if intuitively/with conviction the power/brilliance/peacefulness/ability/leadership of most every Afrikan I encountered. This development lead me to appreciate/realize what required correcting/return for an Afrikan centered lifestyle. I became proactive with decoding/investigating the so called buried truth. As expected I found myself along the journey....more blissful/prepared/devoted. Protection/Self Preservation/Selected Influence/Only Empowering Experiences as life principles have been implemented.

The once fascination with Afrikan People is now a firmly seated innerstanding of our Returning/Re-awakening manifesting/unfolding each moment. Participation/contribution is abundant with sharing of information/resources/support/love/respect/honesty/accountability/kindness transferring belief in our journey of return.

Pls continue to grow/learn/share/teach/endure so that we can, thru/with u! Your presen(ce)ts/contributions far exceed a means to express true gratitude (ineffable). Eternal/infinite influence begins whenever/however u decide/choose/provide. Know that we are with u(s), as u(s), for u(s).

Bliss to u(s)!

Abibifahodie

Aanoir

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/02/2011 10:19 pm
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Kmty Registered

"The Autobiography of Malcolm X" started me on my journey. From Malcolm I gained a sense of self transformation and the strength of the Afrikan character. From here I traveled from the Black Panther Party to John Henrik Clarke to Pan-Africanism to Cheikh Anta Diop to Jacob Carruthers...kwk

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2011 6:43 pm
 Afia78
(@Afia78)

I got tired of feeling weak and sad. I got tired of eating poorly. I got tired of my thought process and behavior. I still have a long way to go but I made my final decision to stay on my path.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/02/2011 9:40 pm
(@noireya)
BlackTastic Kmty Registered

I've always had it in me but did not know how to manifest it. What really prompted it was years ago from an ex of mine who was not a Christian and didn't believe J.C. as the messiah or whatever. Ironically, his name was Christian.. go figure.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/02/2011 4:49 pm
(@patrick_jonathan)
New Kmty Registered

Apartheid was a scourge I needed to get away from. I unknowingly moved to a country where institutionalised racism was formulated and enshrined in their constitution. The 1976 Uprisings in the country of my birth, of my illustrious ancestors and freedom fighters sparked a new awareness in me.
Diop, Chancellor Williams, Kwame Nkrumah became the liberators of my mind and the teachers of Afrika's fabulous history. What a journey!!!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/02/2011 7:19 pm
(@Karimu)
New Kmty Registered

It was when I was 4yrs of age. My Dad took me to visit Aunt Rocsy in Charlot NC. The train stopped and all the Black people had to de-board the train and walk across the trussle, because it was illegible to transport Blacks across the state line. People threw rocks and broke the windows as my Dad hide me under his body. We were traveling from NY.

When I was in the 2nd grade I took my "fanner 50" cap gun to school (only three Black children), after the behind whipping, two weeks later, I found a 22 bullet, took that to school. Expelled, and didn't know how on track I was as a youngster.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/02/2011 7:45 pm
(@Umuchukwu)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

Well, for me it was a mixture of 'I always had it in me,' 'I started asking questions and looking for answers' and 'I realized that Western history isn't all it's cracked up to be.'

Ya see, I had always had it in me in that I was always interested in old cultures. I found myself fascinated at movies, shows, stories and lessons in class about old cultures. But like so many of our youth I had never noticed that they had never taught any of my own. I had found that by joining a group online that had taught and discussed African history and I began 'asking questions and finding answers' and realizing that 'white history ain't all it's cracked up to be.'

But I didn't just look at the ancient cultural heritage of Africa but also the modern problems and how they are maintained and I knew my life had changed forever because I would not rest until something was done about it that would bring total retribution to those who deserve it.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/03/2011 5:32 pm
(@dukuzumurenyi)
BlackStonishing Kmty Registered Registered

When I was about 12 I read a section of my Dad's book Black Voices, the selection in it that I read was from Malcolm X's autobiography, something about it stuck with me [the selection from the autobiography was on his first conk].... fast forward four years and I read another book title I forget... but it was delineating Black firsts...well in the first segment of the book look at classical Afrika and it lauded the exploits of Hannibal of Carthage...then it ended by saying that though his military exploits were great...it was a good thing that he didn't when because "we wouldn't have all of the civilizing gifts that the Romans gave us...roads, etcs." That really pissed me off at the time. Two years after that I was in college and the assigned reading for the English department, with the exception of the class I was enrolled in was..."The Autobiography of Malcolm X." So even though it was not on my classes required reading...I went out and got it....that book changed my life. Then I went out and purchased every book that Malcolm mentions in the Autobiography....then I got old copies of Muhammad Speaks and in the late sixties and early seventies they had a section in there that was a list of required readings....J.A. Rogers and the like were listed there....I bought and read them all.....Chancellor Williams [Destruction & Rebirth], John Jackson..... I was a Christian when I began to read the Autobiography...by the time I finished it I was on a path to the Ancestors. I remember saying that if Malcolm X had been alive then and over the NOI...I would have been a Muslim....

Malcolm X's autobiography let me know that I was not going to keep a slave name.. and that I would be dedicated to the reconstruction of Afrikan people at home and abroad... and that I would not be staying on the Plantation, i.e., America, that I was and Afrikan who was going home, "come hell or high water." Coming home to devote my time to building... my chosen field Education...... my paradigm that of the ancestors....

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/03/2011 7:59 pm
(@lloyd98)
BlackDerful Kmty Registered

two years ago there was so much going around me. none of this great knowledge was around me and no one knew it, so one day i was searching on youtube and there was a brotha who pointed out all our problems here in california and how we were just hated here. that was my take off i wanted to find out what happened to us, and i came across Khalid Muhammad and he was so strong and did not hold his tounge. i have to mention that i never read AT ALL (i was very unconscious) it was baba kambon who recommended a bunch of books on harambee radio i came a long way and i have a long way to go.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/03/2011 12:57 am
(@ayevbosa)
BlackStanding Kmty Registered

I was introduced to Chancellor Williams work "The Destruction of Black Civilization" back in 2000. I never reflected on the concepts described in it very deeply until the 2008 elections when I saw many of the Tamahu loose their minds, even the ones I knew. I ran across the documentary "A Great and Mighty Walk" w/ Elder John Henrik Clarke. It was like the "Matrix plug" was pulled from my consciousness. I stared to reading more and more books by him, Marimba Ani, Frances Cress-Wellsing and others. This was only in the summer of 2010. I knew of Eurocentric hegemony, but didn't fully engage it until later. I am now an adult returning student to the college scene as a Philosophy major and minoring in Black Studies.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/04/2011 11:14 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

merkhuti;42941 wrote: My Afrikan awakening began in my twenties. All my life I simply could not understand why my father was so angry most of the time. He was a handsome almost "crystal black" man with talent and strength. But he drank very heavily and was emotionally abusive to both my mother and me. I would always ask my mother, “Why is daddy so mean?” Sometimes in his drunken fits of rage, he would blurt out how his mother said he had been burnt in an oven as a baby- this forever tormented him. He also served in the military and experienced the carnage of war. He was assigned the grisly work of picking up his comrades dead bodies.

My mother said he never drank before going to war. She, his mother and the rest of his family often commented on his sobriety and pretty even temper. However, by the time of my arrival his descent into madness had taken a firm hold of his once peaceful soul. I am considered light brown complexioned and resemble my mother. When he drank I would then become “the enemy” and called all kinds of terrible names. I use to believe I had done something horrific to him. I just could not figure out what crime I had committed and my mother could never answer the question.

I still had not been given or found the answer to the question of why this smooth black personable man was so full of self-hatred. My father died when I was a teen years before I was led to the real answer. In my child’s mind, the question went like this, “Why does daddy hate ME so much?”

One day years later, my real journey to discovery began simply enough on a gorgeous Sunday afternoon after my mother and I had escaped that hell and we were in our quiet “safe” place. I was watching television and I saw this obviously highly intelligent well-spoken woman talking very calmly to a gentleman who was also intelligent and very attentive to what this beautiful lady was saying.

Who was she I wondered and then her name flashed on the television screen. I was witnessing the mature brilliance of Dr. Frances Cress-Welsing on Listervelt Middleton's "For the People." That afternoon, in that quiet “safe” place, listening to Dr. Welsing explaining the global system of racism/white supremacy was “the door of no return to ignorance” and the beginning of my journey of discovery...

Wow, that's BlackPowerful! Yɛda ase. Thanks for sharing!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 21/05/2011 4:14 am
(@ekundayo)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

For me, my awakening came in the 90's with rap music. Especially Public Enemy. Listening to, and at that time reading, the lyrics of Chuck D, KRS-One, X-Clan and the like, led me to books. This led me back to school and into the mix of some great brothers and sisters. During this time we met, discussed, studied, debated, argued, and read together. Our primary fare was African history/philosophy/culture with a good dose of non-African materials on the side. Our education consisted of books, going to lectures, watching movies and serials on historical figures and events, and lots of listening (to our elders and those more learned than us) and talking (to each other) Through reading, studying, teaching and learning on Afrakan history, life and culture for some years I (finally) embarked upon my present (and lifelong) mission as a nationbuilder, practitioner of Afrikan culture, and (soon to be) father/husband. Just my 2,000 cowries.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/10/2011 12:50 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

ekundayo;46036 wrote: For me, my awakening came in the 90's with rap music. Especially Public Enemy. Listening to, and at that time reading, the lyrics of Chuck D, KRS-One, X-Clan and the like, led me to books. This led me back to school and into the mix of some great brothers and sisters. During this time we met, discussed, studied, debated, argued, and read together. Our primary fare was African history/philosophy/culture with a good dose of non-African materials on the side. Our education consisted of books, going to lectures, watching movies and serials on historical figures and events, and lots of listening (to our elders and those more learned than us) and talking (to each other) Through reading, studying, teaching and learning on Afrakan history, life and culture for some years I (finally) embarked upon my present (and lifelong) mission as a nationbuilder, practitioner of Afrikan culture, and (soon to be) father/husband. Just my 2,000 cowries.

BlackTiful share. Once you make the choice or the choice makes you there's no going back. I was born into a family with sense but I had to choose for myself all the same. It helps to set up hurdles and blocks such that you couldn't go back to insanity even if you wanted to.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 14/10/2011 3:58 pm
(@agya_yaw)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Registered

I thinking of starting a thread like this, meda ase!

I always had a strong love for history, unfortunately all the history I learned through high school did not have us in it. It wasn't until college in the 80's a counselor I had, a brother directly from Afrika, encouraged me to take a Black literature class (he was later fired for reasons they did not explain to us irate students who came looking for him the next semester...you can take a guess why he was fired). This would be my introduction to Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party. Then I saw a lecture by Farrakhan which augmented what I learned in class.

The seminal moment that really put me over was reading 100 Years of Lynching. After I read that book I quit white folks, all the white friends I had ceased to exist that day. All of this happened in a span of 10 months. I've been on the path to find our true selves ever since.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/12/2011 9:50 pm
Page 1 / 3

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share:

June 16th the Kambon family had a major family emergency.  Dr. Kambon’s wife Kala and children were involved in a serious car accident and admitted to the hospital.   All are doing well and recovering.

The family’s only mode of transportation was totaled in the accident.

We are asking for the support of Abibitumi family to assist the Kambon family during this trying time.    

X
X
X
X