Forum

How did you come to...
 
Notifications
Clear all

[Sticky] How did you come to be an Afrikan with sense?

Page 3 / 3
(@youngdd2)
BlackTastic Kmty Registered

I to began to read more then ever and I started to develop an alkebulan world view. Then if you really listen you can hear your ancestors guide you. I still have a ways to go but I'm going in the right direction.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 31/07/2017 4:24 pm
Eza says Blacktastic
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

What organizations or belief systems did you come through and what brought you out of them?

______________________________________________

We must act as if we answer to, and only answer to, our Ancestors, our children, and the unborn.

Amilcar Cabral

ReplyQuote
Posted : 31/07/2017 4:48 pm
Eza says Blacktastic
(@Kalonji_Nkechi)
BlackCredible Kmty Registered

I grew up Christian as I read the browder files and he explained how most of the stories were stolen from ancient kemet and it made sense I start digging more. Than I read John Henrik Clarke Notes to a Afrikan Revolution and he was explaining how there was no exodus no splitting of the sea I stared really examining like how did I ever take that literally when science nor history backs that up. So as I began to get my Afrikan sense and as John Henrik Clarke said why deal with a carbon copy when you can go to the source I went to it and never turned back

Sent from my iPhone using Abibitumi Kasa

ReplyQuote
Posted : 31/07/2017 9:04 pm
?errthang and Eza says Blacktastic
(@Omowale37_)
New Kmty Registered

That's the book that woke Me up from the Browder files it has a lot of information in it and knowledge.

Sent from my SM-T800 using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/08/2017 5:31 pm
?errthang and Eza says Blacktastic
(@youngdd2)
BlackTastic Kmty Registered

Well I ran across an article about 10 black scholars who debunked european propaganda. I started getting book by all 10 scholars and listening to their lectures on YouTube. It fascinated me that they dedicated their lives to liberate our minds.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/08/2017 8:06 pm
?errthang and Eza says Blacktastic
(@donalgodfrey)
New Kmty Registered

I became African when I was about 5 years old when my friend Lorenzo and I were play and we were saying what we wanted to be when we grew up. Lorenzo wanted to be a cowboy because they always would beat the Indians at the end of the movies. I said I wanted to be an astronaut. He laughed at me and said "you can't be no astronaut!" "why not" I said, Lorenzo replied, "cus you a Negro"! "A negro, what's that"? He replied, "you black"! "I'm not Black" I said, looking at my skin, and being insulted. So I asked what was a Negro and if I was Black, and she confirmed Lorenzo's insult. So that was my first understanding of racism in America. Soon after that my home was bombed by the KKK for attending an all white school near my home. This started my journey through life that led me to Africa (Ghana) where I currently live. I wrote a book called "Leaving Freedom to Find Peace". If you are interested check it our on Amazon.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/09/2018 5:34 pm
?errthang and Eza says Blacktastic
 Eza
(@eza)
New Kmty Registered

An Afrikan with (common) sense :)
My journey back to Afrikan sanity started via religion.

Growing up in Nigeria and watching my mom complain on just about everything but never missed an opportunity to pray confounded me. My parents were devout Catholics who very nearly prayed themselves into a stupor. But 'white' Jesus seemed to neither answer nor care.

To me, the more they prayed, the worse things seemed to get. It just made no sense. To make matters worse, they had this huge altar(shrine) of 'white' Jesus & Mary in the living room and boy, was I confused. Why was God an oyinbo? Why didn't God look like us? How come we were never able to see this God we constantly prayed to? And the questions piled on and up.

So, I secretly became an agnostic. At home, I'd be a catholic but when I was away to school I couldn't care less about religion.

To make a long story short, it wasn't until I moved back to the States that I began to discover the works of Dr. John Henry Clarke, Dr. Ben Yosef Jochannan, Dr. Ivan Van Sertima, etc.

Theirs and the works of so many more helped wake me up and led me to the realization that I should be building in Afrika. So, in conclusion, I'm getting ready to leave the hells of North America. Asè.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 18/09/2018 10:22 pm
Batey-Ijoh Besong and ?errthang says Blacktastic
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

Share your story here..read others testimonials

ReplyQuote
Posted : 19/09/2018 5:29 am
(@kevlew)
BlackStonishing Kmty Admin

bump

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/07/2020 6:26 pm
(@adwoaananewaa)
New Kmty Registered

In short, I had to question everything. Though I give thanks to my parents (both biologically and spiritually), for they have taught me well. I am forever grateful. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2020 6:11 pm
 Anonymous

For me, it started in 2005 at the now-closed Hueman Books in Harlem, NYC. I walked in and saw a poster on the wall advertising a book by Dr. Firpo W. Carr called Germany’s Black Holocaust 1890-1945. I was 22 when I realized I had been taught only a minutae of our history up to that point. My sensibilities have sharpened over time and I can now say with sincerity that I am Afrikan.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/07/2020 1:31 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin
Posted by: @adwoaananewaa

In short, I had to question everything. Though I give thanks to my parents (both biologically and spiritually), for they have taught me well. I am forever grateful. 

Have you gotten answers to those questions? @adwoaananewaa

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 15/10/2020 3:15 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin
Posted by: @geronimoknows

For me, it started in 2005 at the now-closed Hueman Books in Harlem, NYC. I walked in and saw a poster on the wall advertising a book by Dr. Firpo W. Carr called Germany’s Black Holocaust 1890-1945. I was 22 when I realized I had been taught only a minutae of our history up to that point. My sensibilities have sharpened over time and I can now say with sincerity that I am Afrikan.

@geronimoknows, you can also read a book called the kaiser's holocaust on Germany's forgotten genocide in Namibia 

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 15/10/2020 3:17 am
Page 3 / 3

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share:

X
X
X
X