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Kikongo mistreated !

(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

KIKONGO MISTREATED !

Mu; Mu(si) = singular
Ba; Be(si) = plural
e.g:
MU-KONGO(Mukongo/Nkongo)
BA-KONGO(Bakongo/Akongo);
TAKE NOTE:
THERE IS NO: “Sin the word: “Bakongo” because the word is already in plural due to the prefix: “BA

MU-NTU(Muntu)
BA-NTU(Bantu)

*************************************************************
MU-Zombo(Muzombo,N’zombo) = man or woman of Makela do Zombo county(Angola)
[originally: MAKELA MA ZOMBO]

BA-Zombo(Bazombo,Azombo) = people from Makela doZombo county, Uíge province (Angola)
[originally MAKELA MA ZOMBO - “...Nzé e Lukezo kà tóma sóba ye fwasá e nkumbuzeto!...”]
**********************************************************

MU-Ana(Muana or Mwana) = son/daughter B-Ana(Bana,Âna) = children
Mwana Kongo Día Ntontela Bana Ba Kongo Día Ntontela
*************************************************************

Musi Nkusu-Mpete = a person from(native) Nkusu-Mpete district in Damba county, Uíge province(Angola).
Besi Nkusu-Mpete = people from Nkusu-Mpete

PLEASE RESPECT THE USE OF NASAL SOUNDS: M and N
KUMBU = FAME NKUMBU = A NOUN
Note: by omitting or ignoring “M” or/and “N” you will be corrupting: nouns, adjectives, verbs etc...
(In this way you may “redefine” Kikongo language itself).

Bala = Hard
Mbala = Name usually given to boys (sorghum, masa ma Mbala).

Baká = 1. to obtain; 2. explanation, sense, preface(to a book)
Mbaka = short(height) man/woman

Banza = v., Think
Mbanza = Town, city

Buka = come in a great crowd
Mbuka = bedstead

Bungu = reason(motive)
Mbungu = ants’ bread

Dinga(dinga-dinga) = larynx
Ndinga = voice

Fulá = to blow, forge
Mfula = n., the powder (cam-wood powder, pepper, crushed ironstone, ochre, &c.) in a bundle of fetish(ebunda)

Funa = leavened (Funisa, v.t., to leaven)
Nfuna = starving

Fuka = to cover
Mfuka = debt

Fwidi = bereavement
Mfwidi = n., one who has been bereaved

Kanda = clan (dynasty?...)
Nkanda = v., to present with one’s freedom

Kanga3 = to tie
Nkanga = bunch(banana bunch)

Káka = alone
Nkaka = grandparent

3 Kanga o nkangu =make a pact. Kanga e mbaki = to ambush

Kendá = "Marching order" - imperative, third person singular - NDÁ! ..., Second person singular (i.e. Go away! ...).
Nkenda = sad(sadness)

Kôngo = west Africa ancient kingdom
Nkongo = good hunter (sniper)

Kôko = arm
Nkóko = river (small river)

Kosi = First (i.e. ordinal numbers,[Kole = Second]
Nkosi = Lion

Kuba4 = v.t., to contribute, give a contribution.
Nkúba = Beating

4 Fundraising, after the appeal for financial aid. Usually before the traditional Bakongo wedding (Lombila), the civil marriage (especially wedding feast) and "imperative" to perform the funeral of a family member, in this context it means the Extended Family i.e. uncles, aunts, sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, cousins ,grandsons, granddaughters, etc ...

Kuna = Preposition, expresses place - location
Nkuna = 1. plant(planted); 2.kind; 3. specie

Kûku = n., a small hoe
Nkuku = 1. grime

Kutu = Ear (ma-kutu = Ears)
Nkutu=Bag (handbag, backpack etc...)

Kûmbi = 1. n., one who has been initiated in the “mystery” of the Elongo or the Eseka; 2. kumbi-kumbi = n., a lady-bird; 3. Transport ( Kumbi dia Ntoto = a car; Kumbi dia zulu(ndeki) = an airplane; Kituku-tuku =a motorbike; Masini = a train; Kumbi dia Kalunga = a ship; paka-paka = an helicopter); Kumbi dia nzadi(nlungu) = a canoe
Nkumbi = n., a wonder, marvel.

Kûmbu = Fame
Nkûmbu = a noun

Kûnga= v.t.,to gather together
Nkûnga = song

Kûlu= foot
Nkúlu = a patriarch

Kúsu= to rub on or smear
Nkusu, (- mingyende) = adv., day by day

Lôngo= 1. Wedding; 2. Marriage
Nlôngo = 1. holy; 2. only; 3. medecine

Lúla = pathway,
Nlûla = n., anger, rage, bitterness. O nlula, adv., in an angry mood; wele o nlula, he went away in an angry mood.

Ludi = truth
Nlúdi = ceiling

Sâlá=Stay (sâlá kiambote = take care, bye ).
Nsâlà=Feather, shell

Sânda
= v., search
Nsánda=Mulembeira

Sâmbu = 1. Psalm; 2. Prayer meeting; 3. Sunday church service
Nsâmbu = grace, favour

Sanga = the adverbial particles, also require the Prefix in k.
Nsânga = 1. necklace: 2, n.,a brother or sister of the opposite sex only, i.e. a brother uses it of a sister & vice-versa

Simbá = 1. to hold; 2. to keep
Nsimbà = older brother/sister twin(the one that was delivered first during birth)

Sita = barren
Nsíta = anger

Suka(suka-suka) = 1. Cramp and stiffness after sitting a long while; 2. stab, v.,
Nsuka(oku nsuka ntu) = 1. finally; 2. at least; 3. in the end

Sunda = v.t. + to overreach, get an advantage over.
Nsúnda = n., the excelling

Sûku = chamber
Nsuku = stocks, fetters.

Têka: v.i. to shine, come out as sunshine after dullness, shine forth
téka = a man’s name, implying that now that he is born the family which had become diminished will soon increase.

Tóna(tonena) = recognize
Ntóna = 1. genius; 2. instinct

Tôko = Young man
Ntôko = Beauty

Tûlu = Sleep
Ntûlu = Breast

Túmbu = Punishment
Ntúmbu = Needle

Tunga = to build
Ntúnga = jigger(jigger flea)

Vûnda = v., to halt for rest
Mvûnda = Debauch, evil effects of, n.,; Drunkenness, the after-effects of, n.,

Vula: 1. disperse of crowds, clouds; 2. be enlarged; 3. nation
Mvûla: selfishness; 2. Rain (original Kikongo: mfwefo = light rain, mvumbi = heavy rain).

Zadi(zadi-zadi) = quickness
Nzádi = river (big river)

Zala = v.i. +to rise (of the tide)
Nzála = hunger

Zengo = n., a woman who has ceased bearing or who has never borne a child, although long married; used also of a man or animal in like condition, a castrated animal, a eunuch.
Nzêngo = n., a sentence, judgment, decision in a law court or in one’s own mind, opinion, a price agreed upon, contract price.

Zïnga5 = 1. Blessing / Wish For example: "LONG LIVE THE KING! ..." (People with authority in general), the proclamation during the traditional ceremony of enthronement of the new king of the Kongo or the new NTONTELA (the title given to the kings of Kongo); 2.to live or remain alive
Nzinga = 1. Roll. Nzinga is the name attributed to children born with the umbilical cord around the neck; 2. an angle, corner.

5 A hole or pool left by a river at low tide. Zinga o nkondo = crossing his arms over the shoulders of the chest.

Zola = love
Nzola = 1. Desire (wishing); 2. Desire (pleasure, enjoyment etc..)

Zômbo: (one of species)Kola nut, a genus of about 125 species of trees
Nzômbo: a siluroid(mud fish?), cat-fish

Zúmba = adultery (Tá Zúmba = to have an affair)
Nzûmba = a woman’s name

Kikongo language, as any other language deserves a “linguist respect”. Hole is not the same word as Whole; Night is not Knight. The list of words sounding alike, is very long in English language.

Although they share the same pronunciation, each word has different meaning.

Source : http://www.luvila.com/

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 19/08/2013 5:27 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

I tell Twi students to think about "humming" the nasals that occur before consonants at the beginning of a word like Mbanza given as an example in this thread (nasals in Twi occur in words like mpa, nkɔ, mframa, etc)
Otherwise, they try to insert a vowel between and make it like "Mebanza" (or in Twi "mepa," "nekɔ," "meframa" instead of mpa, nkɔ, mframa).

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Posted : 02/06/2015 12:54 am
(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;152237 wrote: I tell Twi students to think about "humming" the nasals that occur before consonants at the beginning of a word like Mbanza given as an example in this thread (nasals in Twi occur in words like mpa, nkɔ, mframa, etc)
Otherwise, they try to insert a vowel between and make it like "Mebanza" (or in Twi "mepa," "nekɔ," "meframa" instead of mpa, nkɔ, mframa).

Indeed, the humming is a good idea. The thing is that there is two types like "nt" and "n't" for example, the first one is really short while the second one is more pronounced.
As you can hear in this: http://www.abibitumikasa.com/forums/showthread.php/80001-Kikongo-Bisono-Alphabet-%28w-Audio%29?p=87888&viewfull=1#post87888

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Topic starter Posted : 09/06/2015 8:30 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Akan has the same, but in a different context (tense and aspect rather than just prefix)

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Posted : 10/06/2015 2:47 am
(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;153036 wrote: Akan has the same, but in a different context (tense and aspect rather than just prefix)

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I have to study Akan.

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Topic starter Posted : 15/06/2015 11:50 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

I agree. And I have to get back to studying Kikongo. We have work to do.

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Posted : 16/06/2015 9:29 am
(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Inga, i kedika.

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Topic starter Posted : 17/06/2015 7:48 pm
(@agya_kwaku)
BlackTacular Kmty Admin

Kwé zolele kwénda ? or Vé zolele kwénda? is there a difference?

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Posted : 01/07/2015 9:58 pm
(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Agya Kwaku;155331 wrote: Kwé zolele kwénda ? or Vé zolele kwénda? is there a difference?

Kwé means "where", so the phrase means "where do you want to go?".
Ve means "no", so the phrase means something like "No, you want to go".

It's Bwè (what, how) and Nki (what) which have the same meaning on occasions:
"Bwè kèmbi?" and "Nki kèmbi?" both mean "What did you say?"

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Topic starter Posted : 02/07/2015 5:22 pm
(@agya_kwaku)
BlackTacular Kmty Admin

There is a part in the study group handout that has ve=no and vé = where. That was the vé I was referring to

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Posted : 05/07/2015 1:01 pm
(@mani_kongo)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Agya Kwaku;155662 wrote: There is a part in the study group handout that has ve=no and vé = where. That was the vé I was referring to

Inga, i kedika. My bad, the part you referring to says:
Don't confuse “Ve” with “Vè” (standing for vèyi), where, e.g. Vè wena (where are you); Vè kiena (where is it); Vè kavwèndi (where is he/she sitting).

I took it straight from the original document that we had worked with. Nothing else was explained about it but we can see that Kwè wena (where are you) and Vè wena (where are you) have the exact same meaning so logically, both Kwè zolele kwènda? and Vè zolele kwènda? should mean the same thing. Note that the accent marks on Kwè, Vè and kwènda must be oriented to the right though.

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Topic starter Posted : 07/07/2015 5:08 pm
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