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[Sticky] Kiswahili word of the day

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(@heru_djet)
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Neno ya siku: maisha
Tafsiri (translation): Word of the day: life, lives, lifetime(s)

Mfano: Maisha yetu ni azizi na haziwezi kupimika.
Example:Our lives are valuable and cannot be measured.

Note that the noun maisha is derived from the verb -ishi, live. Hence the methali (proverb) "Kuishi kwingi ni kuona mengi", or "To live long is to see much."

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Topic starter Posted : 15/12/2015 5:17 am
Porter walker and DadaAprili says Blacktastic
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Neno ya siku: elimu

Tafsiri (Translation): education, knowledge, or science.

A related word is Mwalimu, which translates as teacher, scholar, scientist or an erudite person.

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Topic starter Posted : 16/12/2015 9:05 am
DadaAprili says Blacktastic
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Asante sana kakangu.

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Posted : 16/12/2015 9:15 am
DadaAprili says Blacktastic
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Neno ya siku: -uumba

Tafsiri (Translation): Word of the day: create

-uumba is a verb stem and is only used alone in the imperative tense, as in when one gives a command. Thus if one ordered someone to "create something beautiful" you would command them as follows: "Uumba kitu kizuri!" If you were issuing this command to multiple people the verb would be slightly different and would be "Uumbeni kitu kizuri". Typically however the verb is preceded with a subject prefix, but is omitted in the imperative tense--which is for giving commands.

You may recognize -uumba as a result of Kuumba, which is the sixth day of Kwanzaa and the sixth principle of the Nguzo Saba. Verbs that are preceded by the ku prefix are in the "infinitive tense" and usually translates, in the case of Kuumba as "to create" or "creating". Thus as the act of creating, kuumba refers to creativity.

-uumba is also the basis of the noun muumba, which means creator.

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Topic starter Posted : 18/12/2015 10:50 am
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

The root of the word Kujitiwala, -wala, means governing. The ku- prefix makes the verb infinitive. If the word was simply kuwala, then that would translate as "to govern" or "governing". This is the infinitive tense. The second prefix -ji- indicates reflexivity, or that the actors (the persons) executing this action are doing it for themselves. Thus kujitiwala means "to govern oneself" or sovereignty.

From Mama Marimba Ani:
KUJITIWALA

An Afrikan Sovereignist interpretation of the Nguzo Saba

UMOJA (“unity”) The Pan-Afrikanist Vision of Afrikan people throughout the world joining forces to fight for Afrikan Sovereignty and to build an Afrikan World Order.

KUJICHAGULIA (“self-determination”) Afrikan people defining ourselves and determining our own destiny as a Sovereign people.

UJIMA (“collective work and responsibility”) Afrikan people working together, being responsible to and for each other, and accepting a common system of accountability.

UJAMAA (“familyhood”) Creating economic cooperatives based on the concept of Afrikan familyhood, interdependence, interrelationship, and village and national unity.

NIA (“purpose”) Afrikan people sharing common goals that determine our commitments and guide our choices and decisions. This gives purpose to our lives and to our work, and tells us why we were born Afrikan.

KUUMBA (“creativity”) To think with Afrikan minds and to create from our Afrikan-center. When we practice this principle, we no longer imitate europeans. We find our own way.

IMANI (“faith”) To believe in the Vision of Afrikan Sovereignty, and to have the passion and the wer (“will,” “heart”) to bring it into being.

Mama Marimba Ani

Attached files

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Topic starter Posted : 19/12/2015 12:07 pm
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Neno ya siku: wasiwasi
Tafsiri (translation)--Word of the day: worry, anxiety

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Topic starter Posted : 22/12/2015 12:18 pm
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Asante sana

Sent from my GHANA-MADE RLG Uhuru Accu using Tapatalk

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Posted : 23/12/2015 5:46 am
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Obadele Kambon;170913 wrote: Asante sana

Sent from my GHANA-MADE RLG Uhuru Accu using Tapatalk

Si kitu, ndugu.

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Topic starter Posted : 23/12/2015 5:56 am
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Maneno ya siku: Pamoja tutashinda!
Tafsiri (Translation): Words of the day: Together we will win!

Note that Pamoja means together. The root of this word is moja, which is one. As an adjective pamoja suggests oneness, affinity, and togetherness. Tutashinda means "we will win". The verb root is "shinda", which means win. The "tu" prefix is the first person plural pronoun "we". The "ta" prefix is the future tense marker. Hence pamoja (together) tu (we)+ta (will)+shinda (win).

This was a popular expression in the 1960s and 70s. I think that it is still relevant. What about you?

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Topic starter Posted : 27/12/2015 7:22 pm
(@Acaciatwi)
BlackCredible Kmty Registered

Heru Djet;170521 wrote: The root of the word Kujitiwala, -wala, means governing. The ku- prefix makes the verb infinitive. If the word was simply kuwala, then that would translate as "to govern" or "governing". This is the infinitive tense. The second prefix -ji- indicates reflexivity, or that the actors (the persons) executing this action are doing it for themselves. Thus kujitiwala means "to govern oneself" or sovereignty.

From Mama Marimba Ani:
KUJITIWALA

An Afrikan Sovereignist interpretation of the Nguzo Saba

UMOJA (“unity”) The Pan-Afrikanist Vision of Afrikan people throughout the world joining forces to fight for Afrikan Sovereignty and to build an Afrikan World Order.

KUJICHAGULIA (“self-determination”) Afrikan people defining ourselves and determining our own destiny as a Sovereign people.

UJIMA (“collective work and responsibility”) Afrikan people working together, being responsible to and for each other, and accepting a common system of accountability.

UJAMAA (“familyhood”) Creating economic cooperatives based on the concept of Afrikan familyhood, interdependence, interrelationship, and village and national unity.

NIA (“purpose”) Afrikan people sharing common goals that determine our commitments and guide our choices and decisions. This gives purpose to our lives and to our work, and tells us why we were born Afrikan.

KUUMBA (“creativity”) To think with Afrikan minds and to create from our Afrikan-center. When we practice this principle, we no longer imitate europeans. We find our own way.

IMANI (“faith”) To believe in the Vision of Afrikan Sovereignty, and to have the passion and the wer (“will,” “heart”) to bring it into being.

Mama Marimba Ani

This is an elevated interpretation of the nguzo saba, functional for the greater good of 'We'.

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Posted : 27/12/2015 11:35 pm
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Maneno ya siku: Words of the day


Asante: Thank you
Asanteni: Thank you (note: for when addressing more than one person)
Asante sana: Thanks a lot (note: "sana" means to a great extent)
Note: Often Swahili speakers will respond to "asante" by saying "asante".


Ndiyo: Yes
Hapana: No
La: No
Labda: Perhaps, maybe


Habari gani?: What's the news? (Similar to saying "What's up?)
Kwa heri: Goodbye
Karibu: Welcome
Karibuni: Welcome (note: for when addressing more than one person)

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Topic starter Posted : 29/12/2015 12:16 pm
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Neno ya siku: mpendwa
Tafsiri (translation): Word of the day: beloved

At the root of mpendwa is the verb root -penda, which translates as love or like. I might say ninapenda, which is "I love" (present tense), or "ninakupenda", "I love you" (present tense). In the gnomic tense I could also say napenda (I love) or nakupenda (I love you).

Also note that the gnomic tense omits a definitive tense marker. Thus via a tense marker one can specify when an action is occurring. As it relates to -penda a simple conjugation of the verb using the present, past, and tenses are as follows:
'"

    \n".self::process_list_items("'.str_replace('
    ', '', '
    [*]ninapenda--I love (present)
    [*]nilipenda--I loved (past)
    [*]nitapenda--I will love (future)
    ').'")."\n

"'
Changing the end of the verb by adding "wa" in stead of "a" makes the active verb into a passive verb. Thus instead of the act of loving that -penda expresses, -pendwa expresses the act of being loved. Thus if you say anapendwa, you are saying that "she/he is being loved".

In this way mpendwa refers to one's love, a person who is loved.

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Topic starter Posted : 31/12/2015 9:19 am
(@obadelekambon)
Most BlackNificent Kmty! Admin

Asante tena!

Sent from my GHANA-MADE RLG Uhuru Accu using Tapatalk

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Posted : 05/01/2016 4:20 am
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Maneno ya siku: mjinga/wajinga
Tafsiri (translation): fool/fools

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Topic starter Posted : 05/01/2016 11:27 am
(@heru_djet)
BlackTacular Kmty Registered

Maneno ya siku: mgonjwa/wagonjwa
Tafsiri (translation): sick person/sick persons

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Topic starter Posted : 05/01/2016 11:29 am
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