Forum

The Akan, ETs, Siri...
 
Notifications
Clear all

The Akan, ETs, Sirius, Orion, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Lemuria etc

Page 1 / 2
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Greetings,

Below are some of my works and experiences I hope to share so that perhaps some spiritually oriented Africans may find some of it interesting to them on their paths. In sharing/writing these experiences I've also done some further learning on my path.

I would like to introduce a paper I wrote relating to the Akan people in particular but also to some other African peoples. This paper that I wrote, started off as a paper and developed into a small book. I wrote this paper because I was super-pissed off at some of the information I read in some sources about the treatment of indigenous people by the early Christians etc, then also about what some other authors had written about some Africans etc, so I started off to set some records straight based on what I'd come to learn/know, then one thing led to another...the Akan paper represented (at the time) some of what I knew up to that point.

This paper will be seen by some as nonsense or as controversial, by others as outrageous fiction or a waste of time, and yet by others as perhaps interesting, insightful or helpful in one way or another. There are some things I write about that some may completely disagree with or find distasteful, with these, I hope that some of other things I've written about may be of interest or or use, if at all. It is however a very good paper for those interested in this kind of material and some of the stuff I talk about you're likely not to find presented in the same way anywhere else unless you've done some serious research yourself, or unless you're initiated into some order.

My advise to all who read it is to treat it individually. If the material is not to your interest or to your liking, kindly push it aside .

If you are interested in some of the material I wrote about in the Akan paper then by all means I encourage you to enjoy it and share it with like-minded spiritually-oriented individuals. Maybe it will be just for entertainment! It is primarily because of you, my African Brothers and Sisters, that I wrote this Akan paper. As far as I am aware, there is nothing like the Akan paper currently available written by someone else about the Akan in a similar way. It was done out of LOVE (and a bit of anger). I hope other Africans (Ewe, Mande, Yoruba, Kikuyu, Zulu etc etc) will also write independent/original works that make links like I have tried to do, I'll be very interested in reading such works! I am open to receiving as much as I am to giving

I Thank You, and I Thank You again!

[The Akan Paper and other Articles]

www.theakan.com

KwameD aka Akwadapa

....I will also like to at this point introduce my other (controversial to some) work...My African Brothers and Sisters, if this one helps you or interests you in one way or another, please make use of it, if not, kindly disregard it or push it aside. Thanks, and Respect to you!

www.obexperiences.com

Me da mo nyinara ase paa!

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 21/05/2009 5:56 pm
(@Mirabelle_Baidoo)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

Where can I find the paper yo are talking about?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 02/08/2009 4:53 pm
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Mirabelle, you can find the article/book on the website I put up, at http://www.theakan.com/THE%20AKAN.pdf
(click on the above link)

The book/paper is entitled: The Akan, other Africans and the Sirius Star System.

The paper is in .pdf form so you can download it and read it at your leisure.

There are other articles on the website that may be of interest: www.theakan.com

You may also be interested in reading an article written by Philip Ochieng (that was initially published on allafrica.com) that draws parallels between the Maasai, the Canaanites, the Inca, the Dogon, the Wolof, the Bambara (Mande) and the Akan. In my view, what all these groups have in common, is their connection to Sirius.

Interestingly, Ochieng says that the Maasai are "people of the Maa speech". i.e. Maa-saa-i. Here , you can see a link between the name 'Maasai', the root 'saa', and the Akan word 'kasa'. 'Saa' is a root word that is related to Sirian-Reptilian language. In the Mande languages, the word for snake is 'Saa' (Mandinka, Bambara etc). Ochieng's article got close to some truths. Funnily enough, it is also the name used by space beings to refer to the reptilians. (ARI-AN-SAA, or 'Orion Saa'). So you see where 'Orion', and 'Aryan' come from?

The key here is the link to the Sirian-Reptilian extraterrestrial personality that has been called EN-KI or EA by the Sumerian/Babylonians. Interesting fact is that the Maasai call their creator-god Enkai!

There is also a link between the Akan and those who were called Canaanites (who were driven out of their land by the normadic Jewish people, descendants of the Sirian-Reptilian Annunaki). In the Akan paper/book I present a hypothetical but credible scenario showing how the ancestors of the Akan conceivably migrated from the middle east region, through Egypt, through Garamante/Libya (the Garamantian hypothesis is covered in the book, which I show is 'Koromante', not 'Garamante' as Herodotus claimed), through Mande lands and finally to the coast, to settle in Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana and Togo.

Here is Ochieng's article, it's quite a good read if you've not already seen it in the past:
http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=1152

As you may imagine, this ET subject is not a topic folks like to talk about very often, if at all, but well, some things are what they are, in my opinion.

The existence of ETs should not distract us from our efforts towards Liberation and Self-determination, certainly not. It is just an interesting aspect of our history and in the affairs of this planet (especially the lies and cover-ups regarding this very subject), and it puts things into perspective. That's it! That's my take on the matter. I ain't giving my power to no EN-KI or whomever!

This, and much more is covered in the paper.

Medase!
KwameD (Nana Kwame Danquah)

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 03/08/2009 9:09 am
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Abibifo!

I have done a February update on this website (www.theakan.com)
I put up in total about 20 new articles.
There are a number of articles that may be of general interest, I shall highlight these:

Akan fertility doll and the Egyptian Ankh
Akan linguist staff and Ptah's djed
Akan male chieftains and the pyramid breastplate
Akan Spirituality - An Interesting Note on its Nature
Mathematics embedded in Akan weaving patterns

Aseda
Kwame D

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 20/02/2010 12:37 pm
(@Oluwole)
BlackCellent Kmty Registered

Meda ase pa ara me nua. I recently purchased an Akan fertility doll for my wife and the resemblence is amazing!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/04/2010 4:27 am
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Me nua me nso me da wo ase! A very beautiful thing you did! Ampa the two symbols are almost identical in their basic structure, I believe it is not by chance. We will reclaim our heritage! Yε bedi nkonim!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 28/04/2010 1:51 pm
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Brothers and Sisters, I've just updated the Akan Website, something I'd been planning to do for April 2010 but it ended up being completed this first week of May. This time, some of the highlight articles are:


A Mathematical Analysis of Akan Adinkra symmetry
Adinkra Symbols as Kabbalistic Alphabets
Akan-Asona Avian-Feline associations and the Asona Red Snake
Akan symbols derived from brass and gold weights
Akan traditional hairstyle and Egyptian similaritles

Aseda,
KwameD

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 02/05/2010 4:55 pm
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Ebusua, I've just updated the Akan Website with a few new articles so do go there to check them out if you'd like to :D

Aseda,
KwameD

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 19/02/2011 6:11 am
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Folks, new materials have been released and this could possibly the the final update of the website, not sure, since the book is now finished.

....there are some really interesting articles in this release of the Akan Website. Definitely check them out. I will post some of them here on the forum.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 24/08/2011 10:45 pm
(@oyaamah)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

I will be visiting the various links you posted. I am part Akan (Fanti) and know very little of my indigenous culture simply because of a colonized parent. Surely, with the resources and information available to me, I will learn more about my indigenous self!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/08/2011 11:27 pm
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Oyaamah, it is good to hear that you've decided to re-Afrikanize. The Akan Book and Website contains a great deal of info on deep aspects of the Akan. To augment this, there are other books, materials etc that you could get into. It could also help to learn the Akan language at some point in future if you're interested. For me, learning this language is a life-long endeavour. Learning the languages of our people is crucial in re-wiring ourselves in order to eventually access the root of our Racial Memory Complex. So it is important.

If there's anything I can possibly do to aid in transferring info or helping you out, do let me know Keep strong, and sankofa!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 25/08/2011 4:04 am
(@oyaamah)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

Absolutely. Language is very important. I love to study and speak different languages. So far, I've been learning Spanish and Arabic. Since I notice that I love languages and became Afrocentric, I decided that it's best if I focus more on Afrikan languages. Is Akan an actual language or a name for a group of languages? I thought Akan was a name for a group of languages such as Fanti, Ashanti, Twi, etc. I rarely hear Akans (mainly Ghanaians) say that they speak Akan. Many of the Akan languages are mutually intelligible (my father told me this). Soon, I'll be traveling and will have the opportunity to learn Fanti and perhaps other languages spoken in Ghana. I'll definitely browse the website.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/08/2011 10:49 am
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

Well I think Akan refers both to the people and to the language. It's interesting the way it works. All the subgroups of the Akan (Akyem, Asante, Akwamu, Bono, Fante, Sefwi, Wassa etc) speak dialects of one language. It appears that we say the people speak "Fante" or "Twi". So which is which? Is Fante the name of the group of the language spoken? Even for Twi, there is/was a group called "Twifo". Since we add the suffix -fo to the group name (e.g. 'Asantefo', 'Fantefo', 'Denkyirafo', 'Akanfo'...etc, for 'Asante people', 'Fante people', 'Denkyira people', 'Akan people') it appears that the names Asante, Fante etc refer to those who belong to that group of the Akan. So it appears that the group and the language are loosely associated into one concept. Using this logic, we could say that since 'Akan' both refers to the entire group, it could also be associated with the language spoken by the entire group, just as 'Fante' is associated both with the subgroup and with the language and the same is true for Asante.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 25/08/2011 4:55 pm
(@oyaamah)
BlackJestic Kmty Registered

Yes, it's quite interesting. Akan is more or less an umbrella term for different ethnic groups who belong to Akan. I rarely grew up hearing "he speaks Akan". I always heard "he speaks Twi" ( or any other Akan language). I also rarely grew up hearing, "she is Akan" rather "she is Fanti" (or any other group of Akan). So when you suggested that I learn Akan, I thought, "well which language of Akan?", because there are several. I'll have to ask my dad further information about this. It's good to go to people who grew up with the culture and language for such questions/thoughts.
Posted via Mobile Device

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/08/2011 5:44 pm
(@kwamed)
BlackErrific Kmty Registered

It is a good idea to consult with your dad to learn more about the Akan. Technically the people who have come to identify themselves these days as Akan have never really lived together as one 'nation'...in recent history. Apparently (my mum told me this), it was J. B. Danquah who did much of the research into these people and highlighted the name 'Akan' which means 'first, foremost' (it was also J. B. Danquah who apparently did much research into links with the Ghana empire...this man was a pioneer in researching ancient roots. Apparently, he was the one who emphasized the name 'Ghana' to be used for the new nation).

So you're right...when dealing with this or that group of people, we speak of Fante or Asante. Twi itself originated from the Adanse region, which many Akan identify with as an ancient home. The original speakers of this 'dialect' were the Twifo and the Heman. You still find the Twifo today but their dialect 'Twi' is now used as a collective name for the language used in the Asante empire.

These days you hear 'Asante Twi', to distinguish it from 'Akuapem Twi' or 'Akyem Twi'. All three groups and many others have strong ties with the Adanse region, which is now in Asante territory.

What all these people have in common is an underlying cultural and social basis which is reflected not only in the (in some cases) mutual intelligibility of the languages spoken by each subgroup but also in the clan structure system and in 'amani p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; ɛ' (customs) which show the peculiar ways of a people. These are shared more or less by all the groups which are now together called 'Akan'.

Perhaps it's better to speak in terms of the dialects ('devil in the details') rather than one 'Akan' language since there is quite a difference in ways of speaking among all the groups called 'Akan' who share these customs -- as you go from Cote d'Ivoire, through Ghana into Togo, you find many groups who are collectively called 'Akan' but whose dialects show significant differences in some cases when you make a comparison.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 25/08/2011 6:04 pm
Page 1 / 2

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved
Share:

June 16th the Kambon family had a major family emergency.  Dr. Kambon’s wife Kala and children were involved in a serious car accident and admitted to the hospital.   All are doing well and recovering.

The family’s only mode of transportation was totaled in the accident.

We are asking for the support of Abibitumi family to assist the Kambon family during this trying time.    

X
X
X
X