Description

  • Pan-Afrikanism is often regarded as a modern phenomenon and a direct response to colonialism/neo-colonialism and enslavement/neo-enslavement.
  • Usually associated with the coining of the term “Pan-Africanism” in English or retroactively applied to those immediately preceding the coinage.
  • Tied to H.S. Williams and First Pan-African Conference of 1900 organized to “Protect and promote the interest” of people of “African blood or descent.”
  • The concept and practice of unifying Afrikan=Black people (politically, economically, socially, etc.) is an ancient Afrikan=Black imperative and a concept seen in all ancient and modern Afrikan=Black empires which unified various smaller Afrikan=Black ethnic groups and kingdoms, into progressively larger socio-political groupings. As such, examples of this phenomenon of Ancient Pan-Africanism can be found in the empires of Wagadu (Ancient Ghana), Nyani (Ancient Mali), Gao (Ancient Songhay), Kȝš ‘Kush,’ Wene we Kôngo, Kilwa, Imerina, Maravi, Dzimba-dza-mabwe/Dzimba-hwe (Great Zimbabwe), Wene we Mutapa (Monomotapa), Buganda, Rwanda, Kanem-Bornu, Meroë and Kmt ‘Land of Black people’ among many others.
  • The original foreign policy thrust was to integrate more African/Black people into Kmt ‘Land of Black people’ and to incorporate more land of African/Black people.
  • Little to no interest in incorporation of or integration with ˁзm(w)Asiatics’ until very late in the history of Kmt ‘Land of Black people’
  • Lessons from Ancient Pan-Afrikanism are relevant for modern pan-Afrikan Nationalism.

Video Duration: 1 hour, 23 minutes, 17 seconds

121 Slides